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Women's labor force participation and the dynamics of tradition

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  • Hazan, Moshe
  • D. Maoz, Yishay

Abstract

We present a model in which the social norms regarding women’s labor force participation (LFP) differ from the norms concerning men’s. Assuming that these norms depend on past rates of women LFP creates a gradual increase in women LFP.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 75 (2002)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 193-198

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:75:y:2002:i:2:p:193-198

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References

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  1. Andrew B. Abel, 1990. "Asset Prices under Habit Formation and Catching up with the Joneses," NBER Working Papers 3279, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. John Y. Campbell & John H. Cochrane, 1995. "By Force of Habit: A Consumption-Based Explanation of Aggregate Stock Market Behavior," NBER Working Papers 4995, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Oded Galor & David N. Weil, 1993. "The Gender Gap, Fertility, and Growth," NBER Working Papers 4550, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Becker, Gary S, 1991. "A Note on Restaurant Pricing and Other Examples of Social Influences on Price," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(5), pages 1109-16, October.
  5. Assar Lindbeck & Sten Nyberg & Jšrgen W. Weibull, 1999. "Social Norms And Economic Incentives In The Welfare State," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 1-35, February.
  6. John Y. Campbell & John Cochrane, 1999. "Force of Habit: A Consumption-Based Explanation of Aggregate Stock Market Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 205-251, April.
  7. Blomquist, N. Soren, 1993. "Interdependent behavior and the effect of taxes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 211-218, June.
  8. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M, 1997. "Wage Inequality and Family Labor Supply," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 72-97, January.
  9. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
  10. Levine, David I., 1993. "The effect of non-traditional attitudes on married women's labor supply," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 665-679, December.
  11. Carroll, Christopher D & Overland, Jody & Weil, David N, 1997. " Comparison Utility in a Growth Model," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(4), pages 339-67, December.
  12. Smith, James P & Ward, Michael P, 1985. "Time-Series Growth in the Female Labor Force," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages S59-90, January.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Matthias Doepke & Moshe Hazan & Yishay D. Maoz, 2008. "The Baby Boom and World War II: A Macroeconomic Analysis," IEW - Working Papers 355, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  2. Matthew J. Baker & Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2007. "Marriage, Specialization, and the Gender Division of Labor," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 763-793.
  3. Dante Contreras & Agustin Hurtado & M. Francisca Sara, 2012. "La Excepción Chilena y las Percepciones de Género en la Participación Laboral Femenina," Working Papers wp374, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  4. Strulik, Holger, 2014. "A mass phenomenon: The social evolution of obesity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 113-125.
  5. Basant Kapur, 2005. "Can faster income growth reduce well-being?," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 155-171, October.
  6. Moshe Hazan, 2006. "Longevity and Hours over the Lifetime: Data and Implications," 2006 Meeting Papers 416, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  7. Hazan, Moshe & Maoz, Yishay D., 2010. "Women's lifetime labor supply and labor market experience," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 2126-2140, October.

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