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Trends in the Well-Being of American Women, 1970-1995

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  • Francine D. Blau

Abstract

This paper examines the trends in the well-being of American women over the last 25 years, a time of significant changes in the relative economic status of women and in the labor market as a whole. Substantial evidence is obtained of rising gender equality in labor market outcomes and in the allocation of housework within married couple families. However, parallel to the recent evidence of the declining labor market position of lower skilled men, there has been a similar deterioration in the economic status of less educated women, especially high school dropouts, across a wide variety of dimensions.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Literature.

Volume (Year): 36 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 112-165

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Handle: RePEc:aea:jeclit:v:36:y:1998:i:1:p:112-165

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