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The Effect of Economic Opportunity and Family Background on Adolescent Cohabitation and Childbearing among Low-Income Blacks

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  • Olsen, Randall J
  • Farkas, George
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    Abstract

    This article uses a hazards model permitting continuous covariates and fixed effects to estimate the effect of local employment opportunity and family background on the cohabitation and childbearing of black youths from low-income households. Support is found for W. J. Wilson's hypothesis that employment opportunity discourages childbearing outside such unions. However, the latter effect appears to be larger, suggesting that the opportunity-cost hypothesis is the primary channel through which higher employment rates result in lower rates of illegitimacy among underclass youths. Copyright 1990 by University of Chicago Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

    Volume (Year): 8 (1990)
    Issue (Month): 3 (July)
    Pages: 341-62

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:8:y:1990:i:3:p:341-62

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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    Cited by:
    1. Emilia Del Bono, 2004. "Pre-Marital Fertility and Labour Market Opportunities: Evidence from the 1970 British Cohort Study," Economics Series Working Papers 202, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Derek Neal, 2001. "The Economics of Family Structure," NBER Working Papers 8519, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Wilhelmina Leigh, 2004. "Does place matter? Births to African American and Latina adolescents," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 47-64, September.
    4. Arif Mamun, 2006. "The White Picket Fence Dream: Effects of Assets on the Choice of Family Union," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 5009, Mathematica Policy Research.
    5. Fein, David J., 2001. "Will welfare reform influence marriage and fertility? Early evidence from the ABC demonstration," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 427-444, November.
    6. Carol Horton Tremblay & Davina C. Ling, 2005. "AIDS education, condom demand, and the sexual activity of American youth," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(8), pages 851-867.
    7. Michael Kremer & Sylvie Moulin & Robert Namunyu, 2003. "Decentralization: A cautionary tale," Natural Field Experiments 00290, The Field Experiments Website.
    8. Waters, Melissa S. & Ressler, Rand W., 1999. "An economic model of cohabitation and divorce," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 195-206, October.
    9. Francine D. Blau, 1997. "Trends in the Well-Being of American Women, 1970-1995," NBER Working Papers 6206, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Black, Dan A. & McKinnish, Terra G. & Sanders, Seth G., 2003. "Does the availability of high-wage jobs for low-skilled men affect welfare expenditures? Evidence from shocks to the steel and coal industries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(9-10), pages 1921-1942, September.
    11. Paul Glewwe & Michael Kremer & Sylvie Moulin, 1998. "Textbooks and test scores: Evidence from a prospective evaluation in kenya," Natural Field Experiments 00255, The Field Experiments Website.
    12. Paul Schultz, T., 2004. "School subsidies for the poor: evaluating the Mexican Progresa poverty program," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 199-250, June.
    13. T. Paul Schultz, 2001. "School Subsidies for the Poor: Evaluating the Mexican Progresa Poverty Program," Working Papers 834, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.

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