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Textbooks and test scores: Evidence from a prospective evaluation in kenya

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  • Paul Glewwe
  • Michael Kremer
  • Sylvie Moulin

Abstract

Although there is intense debate about the effect of increased expenditure on education in developed countries, there is widespread consensus that provision of textbooks can substantially increase test scores in developing countries. This paper evaluates a program through which a Dutch non-profit organization provided textbooks to 25 rural Kenyan primary schools that were chosen randomly from a group of 100 candidate schools. After one school year, average test scores did not differ substantially between program and comparison schools. However, for those students in the top quintile of the distribution of initial academic achievement, the program raised test scores by at least 0.2 standard deviations.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The Field Experiments Website in its series Natural Field Experiments with number 00255.

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Date of creation: 1998
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Handle: RePEc:feb:natura:00255

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Web page: http://www.fieldexperiments.com

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  1. Hanushek, Eric A, 1995. "Interpreting Recent Research on Schooling in Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 10(2), pages 227-46, August.
  2. Olsen, Randall J & Farkas, George, 1990. "The Effect of Economic Opportunity and Family Background on Adolescent Cohabitation and Childbearing among Low-Income Blacks," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(3), pages 341-62, July.
  3. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1992. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 1-40, February.
  4. James J. Heckman & Jeffrey A. Smith, 1995. "Assessing the Case for Social Experiments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 85-110, Spring.
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Cited by:
  1. Edward Miguel., 2001. "Ethnic Diversity and School Funding in Kenya," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers, University of California at Berkeley C01-119, University of California at Berkeley.
  2. Ted Miguel, 1999. "Ethnic diversity, mobility and school funding: theory and evidence from Kenya," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 6675, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Ted Miguel, 1999. "Ethnic Diversity, Mobility and School Funding: Theory and Evidence From Kenya," STICERD - Development Economics Papers - From 2008 this series has been superseded by Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics 14, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  4. Miguel, Edward & Gugerty, Mary Kay, 2005. "Ethnic diversity, social sanctions, and public goods in Kenya," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 89(11-12), pages 2325-2368, December.

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