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Altruistic versus egoistic behavior in a Public Good game

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  • Matros, Alexander

Abstract

This paper analyzes an evolutionary version of the Public Good game in which boundedly rational agents can use imitation and best-reply decision rules. Several possibilities for both decision rules to be present in the population are considered. I show that altruistic behavior might survive if switching between the decision rules occurs less often than the probabilities of errors in choosing a strategy and if local neighborhoods are not too small or too large.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control.

Volume (Year): 36 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 642-656

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Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:36:y:2012:i:4:p:642-656

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jedc

Related research

Keywords: Public good; Imitation; Best reply; Decision rules;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Daniel Ladley & Ian Wilkinson & Louise Young, 2013. "The Evolution Of Cooperation In Business: Individual Vs. Group Incentives," Discussion Papers in Economics 13/14, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.

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