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Why Isn't the Doha Development Agenda more Poverty Friendly?

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  • Thomas W. Hertel
  • Roman Keeney
  • Maros Ivanic
  • L. Alan Winters

Abstract

Critics of the Doha Development Agenda rightly point to the lack of aggressive reform in wealthy countries for its role in dampening developing country gains. The authors find that the absence of tariff cuts on staple food products in developing countries also critically limits poverty reduction in those countries. Based on their analysis of the impacts of multilateral trade policy reforms in a sample of 15 developing countries, they find there is some evidence of poverty increases amongst the poor who work in agriculture when they lose protection for their earnings. However, these effects are minimized when agricultural tariffs are cut in all developing countries, and when the impact of lower food prices on low income consumers is taken into account in their 15 country sample. Copyright � 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation � 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Review of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 13 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 543-559

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Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:13:y:2009:i:4:p:543-559

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Cited by:
  1. Narayanan, Badri & Hertel, Thomas & Horridge, Mark, 2009. "Disaggregated Data and Trade Policy Analysis: The Value of Linking Partial and General Equilibrium Models," GTAP Working Papers 3162, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  2. Hertel, Thomas W. & Keeney, Roman, 2009. "The Poverty Impacts of Global Commodity Trade Liberalization," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 52786, World Bank.
  3. Susan Stone & Anna Strutt & Thomas Hertel, 2010. "Assessing Socioeconomic Impacts of Transport Infrastructure Projects in the Greater Mekong Subregion," Macroeconomics Working Papers 22819, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  4. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Robinson, Sherman, 2013. "Contribution of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling to Policy Formulation in Developing Countries," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
  5. Willem Thorbecke & Biswa N. Bhattacharyay, 2012. "Role of Production Networks in Sustaining and Rebalancing Asia's Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 3896, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Hertel, Thomas, 2013. "Global Applied General Equilibrium Analysis Using the Global Trade Analysis Project Framework," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
  7. Ahmed, Syud Amer & Hertel, Thomas W. & Martin, William J., 2011. "Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Change," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  8. Rada, Nicholas E. & Rosen, Stacey & Beckman, Jayson, 2013. "Evaluating Agricultural Productivity’s Impact on Food Security," Proceedings Issues, 2013: Productivity and Its Impacts on Global Trade, June 2-4, 2013. Seville, Spain 152265, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
  9. Monika Verma & Thomas Hertel & Ernesto Valenzuela, 2011. "Are the Poverty Effects of Trade Policies Invisible?," School of Economics Working Papers 2011-14, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
  10. Nyhodo, Bonani & Punt, Cecilia & Vink, Nick, 2009. "The potential impact of the Doha Development Agenda on the South African economy: liberalising OECD agriculture and food trade," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 48(1), March.
  11. Filipski, Mateusz & Edward Taylor, J. & Msangi, Siwa, 2011. "Effects of Free Trade on Women and Immigrants: CAFTA and the Rural Dominican Republic," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1862-1877.
  12. Sandra Polaski et al, 2008. "Policy dilemmas in India: The Impact of changes in agricultural prices on rural and urban poverty," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2008-012, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.

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