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Does social software increase labour productivity?

  • Sarbu, Miruna

Social software applications such as wikis, blogs or social networks are being increasingly applied in firms. These applications can be used for external communication as well as knowledge management enabling firms to access internal and external knowledge. Firms can optimize customer relationship management, marketing and market research as well as project management and product development resulting in potential productivity gains for the firms. This paper analyses the relationship between social software applications and labour productivity. Using firm-level data of 907 German manufacturing and service firms, this study examines whether these applications have a positive impact on labour productivity. The analysis is based on a Cobb-Douglas production function. The results reveal that social software has a negative impact on labour productivity. They stay robust for different specifications and alternative measures for social software.

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Paper provided by ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research in its series ZEW Discussion Papers with number 13-041.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:13041
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  1. Irene Bertschek & Jenny Meyer, 2009. "Do Older Workers Lower IT-Enabled Productivity? Firm-Level Evidence from Germany," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 229(2-3), pages 327-342, June.
  2. Mirko Draca & Raffaella Sadun & John Van Reenen, 2006. "Productivity and ICT: A Review of the Evidence," CEP Discussion Papers dp0749, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 2009. "The Economics of Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262012634, June.
  4. Tobias Kretschmer, 2012. "Information and Communication Technologies and Productivity Growth: A Survey of the Literature," OECD Digital Economy Papers 195, OECD Publishing.
  5. Andrew B. Bernard & J. Bradford Jensen & Stephen Redding & Peter K. Schott, 2007. "Firms in International Trade," CEP Discussion Papers dp0795, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Bruno Crépon & Emmanuel Duguet & Jacques Mairesse, 1998. "Research, Innovation and Productivity : An Econometric Analysis at the Firm Level," Working Papers 98-33, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  7. Bronwyn H. Hall & Francesca Lotti & Jacques Mairesse, 2009. "Innovation and productivity in SMEs. Empirical evidence for Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 718, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  8. Helmut Fryges & Joachim Wagner, 2010. "Exports and Profitability: First Evidence for German Manufacturing Firms," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(3), pages 399-423, 03.
  9. Elisabeth Kremp & Jacques Mairesse, 2004. "Knowledge Management, Innovation, and Productivity: A Firm Level Exploration Based on French Manufacturing CIS3 Data," NBER Working Papers 10237, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Crepon, B. & Duguet, E. & Mairesse, J., 1998. "Research Investment, Innovation and Productivity: An Econometric Analysis at the Firm Level," Papiers d'Economie Mathématique et Applications 98.15, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  11. Irene Bertschek & Helmut Fryges & Ulrich Kaiser, 2006. "B2B or Not to Be: Does B2B E-Commerce Increase Labour Productivity?," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 387-405.
  12. Jenny Meyer, 2010. "Does Social Software Support Service Innovation?," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 289-311.
  13. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Düzgün, Ismail & Weiss, Matthias, 2005. "Altern und Produktivität: Zum Stand der Forschung," MEA discussion paper series 05073, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  14. Hempell, Thomas, 2003. "Do Computers Call for Training? Firm-level Evidence on Complementarities Between ICT and Human Capital Investments," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-20, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  15. Bertschek, Irene & Meyer, Jenny, 2010. "IT is never too late for changes? Analysing the relationship between process innovation, IT and older workers," ZEW Discussion Papers 10-053, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  16. repec:fth:inseep:9833 is not listed on IDEAS
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