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Long-run effects of career interruptions: A micro-simulation study

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  • Hänisch, Carsten
  • Klos, Jonas

Abstract

This paper provides a micro-simulation study on the long-run effects of career interruptions in Germany, extending earlier work which generally only focuses on the first few years after an interruption. Using data of the German Socio-Economic Panel, it finds that career interruptions will, for the average individual, have lifelong effects on incomes and labor-force participation. It quantifies these effects for the average affected individual as well as on the entire society and therefore provides additional information on the total cost of career interruptions.

Suggested Citation

  • Hänisch, Carsten & Klos, Jonas, 2016. "Long-run effects of career interruptions: A micro-simulation study," Discussion Paper Series 2016-03, University of Freiburg, Wilfried Guth Endowed Chair for Constitutional Political Economy and Competition Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:wgspdp:201603
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/142142/1/861079647.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hänisch, Carsten & Klos, Jonas, 2014. "A decomposition analysis of the German gender pension gap," Discussion Paper Series 2014-04, University of Freiburg, Wilfried Guth Endowed Chair for Constitutional Political Economy and Competition Policy.
    2. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Smith, Nina, 2002. "Children and Career Interruptions: The Family Gap in Denmark," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(276), pages 609-629, November.
    3. Christian Westermeier & Anika Rasner & Markus M. Grabka, 2012. "The Prospects of the Baby Boomers: Methodological Challenges in Projecting the Lives of an Aging Cohort," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 440, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Roberto Leombruni & Matteo Richiardi, 2006. "LABORsim: An Agent-Based Microsimulation of Labour Supply – An Application to Italy," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 63-88, February.
    5. Cathal O'Donoghue & John Lennon & Stephen Hynes, 2009. "The Life-Cycle Income Analysis Model (LIAM): a study of a flexible dynamic microsimulation modelling computing framework," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 2(1), pages 16-31.
    6. Geyer, Johannes & Steiner, Viktor, 2014. "Future public pensions and changing employment patterns across birth cohorts," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(02), pages 172-209, April.
    7. Axel Boersch-Supan & Christina B. Wilke, 2004. "The German Public Pension System: How it Was, How it Will Be," NBER Working Papers 10525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Niklas Potrafke, 2007. "The Timing of Employment Breaks: How Does It Affect Pension Benefits? ; Empirical Evidence from Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 710, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    9. Christy Spivey, 2005. "Time off at What Price? The Effects of Career Interruptions on Earnings," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(1), pages 119-140, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    micro-simulation; career interruptions; lifetime income;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions

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