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Who accepts bribery? Evidence from a global household survey

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  • Graf Lambsdorff, Johann

Abstract

This paper processes responses from households in 66 countries to address differences in the extent to which bribes and gifts are considered acceptable. Levels of acceptance differ substantially from one country to another, but they do not conform to popular expectations: Respondents in rich, western countries do not exhibit lower levels of acceptance. A higher acceptance of bribery can be observed in former colonies and those without a majority religion. Acceptance is higher among those who paid a bribe. Buddhists and less educated judge more situation-specific, accepting more often if they paid bribes themselves. Culture shapes attitudes towards bribery, but the western world fails to exhibit the expected moral rigor.

Suggested Citation

  • Graf Lambsdorff, Johann, 2010. "Who accepts bribery? Evidence from a global household survey," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Volkswirtschaftliche Reihe V-61-10, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:upadvr:v6110
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Swamy, Anand & Knack, Stephen & Lee, Young & Azfar, Omar, 2001. "Gender and corruption," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 25-55, February.
    2. Roberta Gatti & Stefano Paternostro & Jamele Rigolini, 2003. "Individual attitudes toward corruption: do social effects matter?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3122, The World Bank.
    3. Günther G. Schulze & Björn Frank, 2003. "Deterrence versus intrinsic motivation: Experimental evidence on the determinants of corruptibility," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 143-160, August.
    4. Paldam, Martin, 2001. "Corruption and Religion Adding to the Economic Model," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2-3), pages 383-413.
    5. Sandholtz, Wayne & Gray, Mark M., 2003. "International Integration and National Corruption," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(04), pages 761-800, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Civil Liberty; Colonialism; Corruption; Cognitive Dissonance; Moral Reasoning; Moral Superiority; Religion;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods

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