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Border carbon adjustment: Not a very promising climate policy instrument

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  • Weitzel, Matthias
  • Peterson, Sonja

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  • Weitzel, Matthias & Peterson, Sonja, 2012. "Border carbon adjustment: Not a very promising climate policy instrument," Kiel Policy Brief 55, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkpb:55
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    1. Weitzel, Matthias & Hübler, Michael & Peterson, Sonja, 2012. "Fair, optimal or detrimental? Environmental vs. strategic use of border carbon adjustment," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S2), pages 198-207.
    2. Lanzi, Elisa & Chateau, Jean & Dellink, Rob, 2012. "Alternative approaches for levelling carbon prices in a world with fragmented carbon markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S2), pages 240-250.
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