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Immigration Policy and Remittance Behaviour

Author

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  • Piracha, Matloob
  • Tani, Massimiliano
  • Tchuente, Guy

Abstract

This paper analyses the impact of a change in Australia's immigration policy, introduced in the mid-1990s, on migrants' remittance behaviour. More precisely, we compare the remittance behaviour of two cohorts who entered Australia before and after the policy change, which consists of stricter entry requirements. Our empirical strategy uses conditional difference-in-differences in the presence of interactive fixed-effects. We first show that Bai's (2009) least squares estimator and conditional difference-in-differences are biased if used on their own. We then derive conditions that are required to obtain a consistent estimator using a combination of conditional difference-in-differences and Bai's (2009) least squares estimator. The results indicate that those who entered under more stringent conditions - the second cohort - have a higher probability to remit than those in the first cohort, though the policy change has no discernible effect on the level of remittances.

Suggested Citation

  • Piracha, Matloob & Tani, Massimiliano & Tchuente, Guy, 2017. "Immigration Policy and Remittance Behaviour," GLO Discussion Paper Series 94, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:94
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Albert Bollard & David McKenzie & Melanie Morten & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Remittances and the Brain Drain Revisited: The Microdata Show That More Educated Migrants Remit More," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 25(1), pages 132-156, May.
    2. Laurent Gobillon & Thierry Magnac, 2016. "Regional Policy Evaluation: Interactive Fixed Effects and Synthetic Controls," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(3), pages 535-551, July.
    3. M. Piracha & Y. Zhu, 2012. "Precautionary savings by natives and immigrants in Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(21), pages 2767-2776, July.
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    5. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2003. "Public policy and the labor market adjustment of new immigrants to Australia," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 655-681, November.
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    14. Laurent Gobillon & Thierry Magnac, 2016. "Regional Policy Evaluation: Interactive Fixed Effects and Synthetic Controls," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(3), pages 535-551, July.
    15. Yoko Niimi & Caglar Ozden & Maurice Schiff, 2010. "Remittances and the Brain Drain: Skilled Migrants Do Remit Less," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 97-98, pages 123-141.
    16. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2006. "Remittances as insurance: evidence from Mexican immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(2), pages 227-254, June.
    17. Prem Jung Thapa & Tue Gørgens, 2006. "Finding Employment After Migration: How Long Does It Take?," Chapters, in: Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Siew-Ean Khoo (ed.), Public Policy and Immigrant Settlement, chapter 3, Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Maud HAZAN & Claire ZANUSO & Rafael NOVELLA, 2018. "Aspirations, attentes et réalités de la jeunesse dans un Etat fragile : le cas haïtien," Working Paper 98e53f2a-19d2-4649-a3e5-6, Agence française de développement.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Treatment effect; difference-in-differences;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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