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The long-term effect of migration on economic inequality between EU Member States

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  • Ulceluse, Magdalena

Abstract

This paper explores the long-term effect of migration on economic inequality between the 28 EU member states, covering the period 1995-2017. The cross-national, longitudinal analysis demonstrates that migration has had a positive and significant effect on development and economic growth in 28 member states. However, the findings also indicate that some countries have benefitted from migration more than others. Specifically, for countries experiencing positive net migration the effect is disproportionately larger than for countries experiencing negative net migration. This seems to indicate that, while migration has indeed contributed to economic development in all member states over the period analysed, it has not necessarily contributed to decreasing economic inequalities between them.

Suggested Citation

  • Ulceluse, Magdalena, 2019. "The long-term effect of migration on economic inequality between EU Member States," GLO Discussion Paper Series 383, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:383
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/201833/1/GLO-DP-0383.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; emigration; inequality; migration and development; EU;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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