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War and Social Attitudes

Author

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  • Child, Travers Barclay
  • Nikolova, Elena

Abstract

We study the long-run effects of con ict on social attitudes, with World War II in Central and Eastern Europe as our setting. Much of earlier work has relied on self- reported measures of victimization, which are prone to endogenous misreporting. With our own survey-based measure, we replicate established findings linking victimization to political participation, civic engagement, optimism, and trust. Those findings are reversed, however, when tested instead with an objective measure of victimization based on historical reference material. Thus, we urge caution when interpreting survey- based results from this literature as causal.

Suggested Citation

  • Child, Travers Barclay & Nikolova, Elena, 2018. "War and Social Attitudes," GLO Discussion Paper Series 279, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:279
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lorenzo Almada & Ian McCarthy & Rusty Tchernis, 2016. "What Can We Learn about the Effects of Food Stamps on Obesity in the Presence of Misreporting?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 98(4), pages 997-1017.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    conflict; social attitudes; World War II;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • N44 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Europe: 1913-
    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General

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