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Financial stress and Indigenous Australians

Author

Listed:
  • Breunig, Robert
  • Hasan, Syed
  • Hunter, Boyd

Abstract

We examine the high levels of financial stress among Indigenous populations in Australia. We estimate separate models for the determinants of financial stress for Indigenous and non-Indigenous households and show the importance of separately considering Indigenous disadvantage. We use these models to build equivalence scales for both groups. We find evidence consistent with financial stress being exacerbated by demand-sharing (“humbugging”). The evidence also suggests that financial stress is reduced by engagement in traditional hunting and gathering activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Breunig, Robert & Hasan, Syed & Hunter, Boyd, 2018. "Financial stress and Indigenous Australians," GLO Discussion Paper Series 164, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:164
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/173215/1/GLO-DP-0164.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Boyd H. Hunter & Steven Kennedy & Nicholas Biddle, 2004. "Indigenous and Other Australian Poverty: Revisiting the Importance of Equivalence Scales," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(251), pages 411-422, December.
    2. Deborah Cobb-Clark & David Ribar, 2012. "Financial stress, family relationships, and Australian youths’ transitions from home and school," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 469-490, December.
    3. Robert Breunig & Deborah Cobb-Clark & Xiaodong Gong & Danielle Venn, 2007. "Disagreement in Australian partners’ reports of financial difficulty," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 59-82, March.
    4. Boyd H. Hunter & Steven Kennedy & Daniel Smith, 2003. "Household Composition, Equivalence Scales and the Reliability of Income Distributions: Some Evidence for Indigenous and Other Australians," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 79(244), pages 70-83, March.
    5. Deaton,Angus & Muellbauer,John, 1980. "Economics and Consumer Behavior," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521296762, December.
    6. Gianni La Cava & John Simon, 2005. "Household Debt and Financial Constraints in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 38(1), pages 40-60, March.
    7. Hall,Gillette H. & Patrinos,Harry Anthony (ed.), 2012. "Indigenous Peoples, Poverty, and Development," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107020573, December.
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    1. repec:gam:jsoctx:v:8:y:2018:i:2:p:37-:d:150408 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial stress; hardship; cashflow; equivalence scales; Indigenous poverty;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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