IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Distressed debt in Germany: What's next? Possible innovative exit strategies

  • Dickler, Robert A.
  • Schalast, Christoph

During the past two years, private equity funds have acquired substantial portfolios of nonperforming loans from banks in Germany. Typically a private equity investor does not commit funds unless exit strategies are clearly defined. The usual exit strategies for distressed debt investors are fix it (restructuring and turnaround), sell it (sale of debt or equity), or shut it down (liquidation). A new alternative exit strategy for NPL investors considered here is the transfer of credit recovery risk.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/27841/1/577674986.PDF
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Frankfurt School of Finance and Management in its series Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series with number 73.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:zbw:fsfmwp:73
Contact details of provider: Postal: Sonnemannstraße 9-11, 60314 Frankfurt am Main
Phone: 069 154008-0
Web page: http://www.frankfurt-school.de/

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. von Westernhagen, Natalja & Porath, Daniel & Hayden, Evelyn, 2006. "Does diversification improve the performance of German banks? Evidence from individual bank loan portfolios," Discussion Paper Series 2: Banking and Financial Studies 2006,05, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  2. Edward J. Kane, 1981. "Accelerating Inflation, Technological Innovation, and the Decreasing Effectiveness of Banking Regulation," NBER Working Papers 0638, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Kane, Edward J, 1977. "Good Intentions and Unintended Evil: The Case against Selective Credit Allocation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 9(1), pages 55-69, February.
  4. Broecker, Thorsten, 1990. "Credit-Worthiness Tests and Interbank Competition," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(2), pages 429-52, March.
  5. Alex Stomper, 2006. "A Theory of Banks' Industry Expertise, Market Power, and Credit Risk," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(10), pages 1618-1633, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:fsfmwp:73. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.