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Internet Use and Ethnic Heterogeneity in a Cross-Section of Countries

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  • Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa
  • Okai, Davidson
  • Posso, Alberto

Abstract

This paper investigates the association between ethnic heterogeneity and information technology related outcomes such as internet access and internet use. We argue that the global digital divide, as measured by cross-country differences in internet access and use, could be explained by cross-country differences in ethnic heterogeneity. We use indices of ethnic and linguistic fractionalization as measures of ethnic heterogeneity. Using data on a cross-section of 93 countries, we find evidence of a negative association between ethnic heterogeneity and the use and access of internet. Thus, cross-country differences in the global digital divide can be explained by the levels of ethnic fractionalization. Other determinants of the digital divide include income, infrastructure, literacy level, level of urbanization and inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Okai, Davidson & Posso, Alberto, 2015. "Internet Use and Ethnic Heterogeneity in a Cross-Section of Countries," EconStor Preprints 110902, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:esprep:110902
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chen, Jian & Fleisher, Belton M., 1996. "Regional Income Inequality and Economic Growth in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 141-164, April.
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    8. Seguino, Stephanie, 2000. "Gender Inequality and Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1211-1230, July.
    9. Pelle Ahlerup & Ola Olsson, 2012. "The roots of ethnic diversity," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 71-102, June.
    10. Cong Wang & Bodo Steiner, 2015. "Can Ethno-Linguistic Diversity Explain Cross-Country Differences in Social Capital?: A Global Perspective," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 91(294), pages 338-366, September.
    11. Consoli, Davide, 2008. "Co-evolution of capabilities and preferences in the adoption of new technologies," MPRA Paper 7175, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    14. Paul DiMaggio & Eszter Hargittai & W. Russell Neuman & John P. Robinson, 2001. "Social Implications of the Internet," Working Papers 159, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies..
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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice Asongu & Oasis Kodila-tedika, 2017. "Tribalism and Government Effectiveness," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(1), pages 156-167.
    2. Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Smyth, Russell, 2017. "Ethnic Diversity and Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 285-302.
    3. repec:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i:300:p:112-141 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Nuhu, Ahmed Salim, 2015. "Ethnic Diversity and Educational Attainment," EconStor Conference Papers 125567, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    5. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1454-7 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    ethnic diversity; digital divide; information inequality; internet;

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