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Agent-Based Models of Industrial Clusters and Districts

  • Guido Fioretti

    (University of Bologna)

Agent-based models, an instance of the wider class of connectionist models, allow bottom-up simulations of organizations constituted byu a large number of interacting parts. Thus, geogrfaphical clusters of competing or collaborating firms constitute an obvious field of application. This contribution explains what agent-based models are, reviews applications in the field of industrial clusters and focuses on a simulator of infra- and inter-firm communications.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/urb/papers/0504/0504009.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Urban/Regional with number 0504009.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: 28 Apr 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpur:0504009
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 22. Forthcoming in F. Columbus (Ed.), 'Contemporary Issues in Urban and Regional Economics'. Nova Science Publishers.
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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