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Investment, Credit Rationing, and the Soft Budget Constraint: What Would a Well-Functioning Credit Market Look Like?

Author

Listed:
  • Jan Hanousek

    (CERGE-EI, Prague)

  • Randall K. Filer

    (CUNY)

Abstract

IV estimates of the link between profits and investment in the Czech Republic find a complex relationship. While firms may occasionally be credit rationed or face soft budget constraints, investments generally flow to industries with the greatest profit potential or need for recapitalization

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Hanousek & Randall K. Filer, 2003. "Investment, Credit Rationing, and the Soft Budget Constraint: What Would a Well-Functioning Credit Market Look Like?," Microeconomics 0306003, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpmi:0306003
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; prepared on IBM PC ; to print on HP/PostScript; pages: 10 ; figures: included
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Timothy Erickson & Toni M. Whited, 2000. "Measurement Error and the Relationship between Investment and q," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(5), pages 1027-1057, October.
    2. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    3. Steven M. Fazzari & R. Glenn Hubbard & Bruce C. Petersen, 1988. "Financing Constraints and Corporate Investment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(1), pages 141-206.
    4. Lubomír Lízal & Jan Svejnar, 2002. "Investment, Credit Rationing, And The Soft Budget Constraint: Evidence From Czech Panel Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(2), pages 353-370, May.
    5. Joao F. Gomes, 2001. "Financing Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1263-1285, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nataliya Zinych & Martin Odening, 2009. "Capital market imperfections in economic transition: empirical evidence from Ukrainian agriculture," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(6), pages 677-689, November.
    2. Roman Horváth, 2005. "Financial Accelerator Effects in the Balance Sheets of Czech Firms," Working Papers IES 96, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised 2005.
    3. Marc Cowling & Weixi Liu & Maria Minniti & Ning Zhang, 2016. "UK credit and discouragement during the GFC," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 1049-1074, December.
    4. Jarko Fidrmuc & Roman Horváth & Eva Horváthová, 2010. "Corporate Interest Rates and the Financial Accelerator in the Czech Republic," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(4), pages 41-54, January.
    5. Sergey Sinelnikov & Pavel Kadochnikov & Ilya Trunin (ed.), 2006. "Fiscal Federalism in Russia: Soft Budget Constraints of Regional Governments," Books, Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, edition 1, number 4, May.
    6. Zinych, Nataliya & Odening, Martin, 2009. "How Costly are (Agricultural) Investments during Economic Transition? A Critical Literature Appraisal," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 50319, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Alexeev, Michael & Kim, Sunghwan, 2008. "The Korean financial crisis and the soft budget constraint," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 178-193, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Investment; Transition Economies; Soft budget constraint;

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment
    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance

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