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Trade, Technology, and Plant Performance

Author

Listed:
  • J. Bradford Jensen

    (Bureau of the Census,Economics, Statistics Administration,Department of Commerce)

  • Nathan Musick

    (Office of Policy Development,Economics and Statistics Administration,Department of Commerce)

Abstract

Previous research shows that both exporting and the use of advanced technologies independently enhance the performance of U.S. manufacturing plants in a variety of ways. The research presented below shows that plants that both export and use advanced technology outperform other plants in a number of important ways: they increase their employment more rapidly, they pay higher wages, and they are less likely to fail. The research also shows that manufacturing plants that use advanced technologies are more likely to export.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Bradford Jensen & Nathan Musick, 1996. "Trade, Technology, and Plant Performance," Industrial Organization 9603004, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpio:9603004
    Note: Type of Document - Microsoft Word; prepared on IBM PC; to print on HP; pages: 30 ; figures: none. Comments welcome.
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert Mcguckin & Mary Streitwieser & Mark Doms, 1998. "The Effect Of Technology Use On Productivity Growth," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 1-26.
    2. Dunne, Timothy & Schmitz, James A, Jr, 1995. "Wages, Employment Structure and Employer Size-Wage Premia: Their Relationship to Advanced-Technology Usage at US Manufacturing Establishments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 62(245), pages 89-107, February.
    3. Mark Doms & Timothy Dunne & Kenneth R. Troske, 1997. "Workers, Wages, and Technology," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 253-290.
    4. Doms, Mark & Dunne, Timothy & Roberts, Mark J., 1995. "The role of technology use in the survival and growth of manufacturing plants," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 523-542, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joachim Wagner, 2007. "Exports and Productivity: A Survey of the Evidence from Firm-level Data," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(1), pages 60-82, January.
    2. Tabrizy, Saleh S. & Trofimenko, Natalia, 2010. "Scope for export-led growth in a large emerging economy: Is India learning by exporting?," Kiel Working Papers 1633, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Catherine L. Mann, 1997. "Globalization and productivity in the United States and Germany," International Finance Discussion Papers 595, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Nathan Musick, 1998. "Heroic Plants: Persistently Rapid Job Creators in the Longitudinal Research Database - Their Distinguishing Characteristics and Contribution to Employment Growth," Industrial Organization 9811001, EconWPA.
    5. Tomasz Serwach, 2012. "Why Learning by Exporting May Not Be As Common As You Think and What It Means for Policy," International Journal of Management, Knowledge and Learning, International School for Social and Business Studies, Celje, Slovenia, vol. 1(2), pages 157-172.
    6. Mann, Catherina L., 2003. "A fizetési mérleg hiánya és a hiány fenntarthatósága az Egyesült Államokban
      [Perspectives on the US current account deficit and sustainability]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(10), pages 891-910.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    trade technology employment productivity wages and salaries;

    JEL classification:

    • D20 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - General
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • L10 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - General
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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