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Child Malnutrition, Social Development and Health Services in the Andean Region

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  • LARREA CARLOS

    (FLACSO)

  • MONTALVO PEDRO

    (FLACSO)

  • RICAURTE ANA

    (FLACSO)

Abstract

This study analyzes social, ethnic and regional determinants of child malnutrition, as well as the effects of access to health services in the Andean Region, through a comparison between Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. These three countries share a profile with high stunting prevalence and strong socio-economic, regional and ethnic disparities. The analysis is conducted using DHS (Peru 1992, 1996 and 2000, Bolivia 1997) and LSMS (Ecuador 1998) surveys and it focuses on an international comparative perspective. In the case of Ecuador a detailed analysis is provided. The main task was to identify the determinants of the z-score indicators for height and weight for age. For that matter, multiple equation models were estimated, applying instrumental variables and combining different multivariate procedures, to identify the relative importance of education, housing, ethnicity and contextual regional factors as determinants of stunting in each national case. In all cases we have found strong negative ethnic effects of indigenous ethnicity as well as contextual regional negative factors for highland regions. The results remain significant even after controlling for all relevant socio- economic determinants, such as education, housing and economic status, with few exceptions.

Suggested Citation

  • Larrea Carlos & Montalvo Pedro & Ricaurte Ana, 2005. "Child Malnutrition, Social Development and Health Services in the Andean Region," HEW 0509011, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwphe:0509011
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Oded Galor & David Mayer-Foulkes, 2004. "Food for Thought: Basic Needs and Persistent Educational Inequality," GE, Growth, Math methods 0410002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Wagstaff, Adam & Watanabe, Naoko, 2000. "Socioeconomic inequalities in child malnutrition in the developing world," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2434, The World Bank.
    3. Vicente Fretes-Cibils & Marcelo M. Giugale & José Roberto López-Cálix, 2003. "Ecuador : An Economic and Social Agenda in the New Millennium," World Bank Publications - Reports 14613, The World Bank Group.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ramirez, N.F. & Gamboa, L.F. & Bedi, A.S. & Sparrow, R.A., 2012. "Child malnutrition and antenatal care: Evidence from three Latin American countries," ISS Working Papers - General Series 536, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    2. Behrman, Jere R. & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2004. "Correlates and determinants of child anthropometrics in Latin America: background and overview of the symposium," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 335-351, December.
    3. World Bank, 2007. "Nutritional Failure in Ecuador : Causes, Consequences, and Solutions," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 6651, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    nutrition; health; child; cronic; waste; stunting; Child anthropometric measures Principal component analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare

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