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Business cycle effects on Portfolio Credit Risk: scenario generation through Dynamic Factor analysis

  • rea cipollini

    (queen mary university of london)

  • giuseppe missaglia


In this paper, we focus on measuring the risk associated to a bank loan portfolio. In particular, we depart from the standard one factor model representation of portfolio credit risk. In particular, we consider an hetrogeneous portfolio, and we account for stochastic dependent recoveries. We also examine the influence of either one systemic shock (interpreted as the state of the business cycle) or two systemic shocks (interpreted as demand and supply innovations) on portfolio credit risk. The identification and estimation of the common shocks is obtained by fitting a Dynamic Factor model to a large number of macro credit drivers. The scenarios are obtained by employing Montecarlo stochastic simulation.

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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Finance with number 0502010.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: 11 Feb 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpfi:0502010
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 21
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  1. Til Schuermann & Björn-Jakob Treutler & Scott M. Weiner & M. Hashem Pesaran, 2003. "Macroeconomic Dynamics and Credit Risk: A Global Perspective," CESifo Working Paper Series 995, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Mario Forni & Marc Hallin & Lucrezia Reichlin & Marco Lippi, 2000. "The generalised dynamic factor model: identification and estimation," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10143, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. Edward I. Altman & Brooks Brady & Andrea Resti & Andrea Sironi, 2005. "The Link between Default and Recovery Rates: Theory, Empirical Evidence, and Implications," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 78(6), pages 2203-2228, November.
  4. Nickell, Pamela & Perraudin, William & Varotto, Simone, 2000. "Stability of rating transitions," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 203-227, January.
  5. Forni, Mario & Lippi, Marco & Reichlin, Lucrezia, 2003. "Opening the Black Box: Structural Factor Models versus Structural VARs," CEPR Discussion Papers 4133, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Uhlig, Harald, 2005. "What are the effects of monetary policy on output? Results from an agnostic identification procedure," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 381-419, March.
  7. Andrew G Haldane & Glenn Hoggarth & Victoria Saporta, 2001. "Assessing financial system stability, efficiency and structure at the Bank of England," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Marrying the macro- and micro-prudential dimensions of financial stability, volume 1, pages 138-159 Bank for International Settlements.
  8. Domenico Giannone & Lucrezia Reichlin & Luca Sala, 2006. "VARs, common factors and the empirical validation of equilibrium business cycle models," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10127, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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