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Assessing the Money, Exchange Rate, Price Links during Hyperinflationary Episodes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

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  • Jean-Claude Maswana

    (Kyoto University)

Abstract

The determination of the causal pattern among inflation, money growth, and exchange rate has important implications for policymakers regarding appropriate stabilization policies in developing economies. Using Congolese data where the pace of broad money growth and hyperinflation (23,760% annual change) reached record levels in early 1990s, we use single−equation multivariate autoregressive models with the optimal lag selected using Hsiao fs approach to Granger causality. Results indicate feedback causality between inflation and money growth on one side, and unidirectional Granger causality from money growth to the exchange rate and from the exchange rate to inflation on the other. These results suggest that the over−riding goal of disinflation needs to be accomplished initially by exchange rate stabilization, followed by a direct inflation targeting.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Claude Maswana, 2005. "Assessing the Money, Exchange Rate, Price Links during Hyperinflationary Episodes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo," Development and Comp Systems 0511023, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0511023
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 12. Inflation in the DR Congo
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    Cited by:

    1. Zelealem Yiheyis & Emmanuel Cleeve, 2016. "Dynamics of the Real Exchange Rate, Inflation, and Output Growth: The Case of Malawi," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 8(10), pages 23-39, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Congo Inflation Hsiao's version of Granger Causality;

    JEL classification:

    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • P - Economic Systems

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