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National System of Innovation: A Note on Technological Asymmetries and Catching-Up Perspectives

  • M. Cimoli

The main purpose of this paper is to describe a simple model for the understanding of empirical and analytical potential achievements of the NIS approach , particularly with regards at the sources that explain different growth performances across countries. First, the paper provide a summary view of the neo-Schumpeterian approach and its main contributions on technology as an important source of asymmetries between countries, in terms of trade specialization, forging ahead, catching-up and falling behind perspectives. Second, the paper suggest the hypothesis that NIS could be considered as an useful proxy of the institutional differences and support the idea of the increasing importance of "created assets" in the explanation of growth and specialization performances. By introducing this macro-representation a comparative analysis of the "goodness" or "badness" of the NIS in terms of the main implication for specialization and economic performances, as different scenarios characterized by catching-up, falling-behind and forging ahead perspectives, could be possible. Third, throughout this discussion it is pinpointed that the interplay between NIS and performances is not linear and a deterministic conlusion cannot be drawn. It is particularly stressed that the nature of the interplay between NIS and economic performances is also shaped, among others, by the historical events related to industries ad technological strategies, the specialization pattern, the constraints imposed by trade balance conditions and the policies related to the macroeconomic setting and exchange rate stabilization policies. The last section contains a simple graphical model of the interplay between NIS, competencies and growth performances.

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Paper provided by International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in its series Working Papers with number ir98030.

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Date of creation: Jun 1998
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wop:iasawp:ir98030
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  1. Jan Fagerberg, 1988. "International Competitiveness," Working Papers Archives 1988001, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
  2. Amable, Bruno, 2000. "International specialisation and growth," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 413-431, December.
  3. M. Cimoli & M. della Giusta, 1998. "The Nature of Technological Change and Its Main Implications on National and Local Systems of Innovation," Working Papers ir98029, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
  4. Jan Fagerberg, 1995. "Convergence or Divergence - The Impact of Technology," Working Papers Archives 1995524, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
  5. Jan Fagerberg, 1995. "Is there a large-country advantage in high-tech?," Working Papers Archives 1995526, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
  6. Abramovitz,Moses, 1989. "Thinking about Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521333962, October.
  7. Giovanni Dosi & Christopher Freeman & Richard Nelson & Gerarld Silverberg & Luc Soete (ed.), 1988. "Technical Change and Economic Theory," LEM Book Series, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy, number dosietal-1988, August.
  8. Arthur, W Brian, 1989. "Competing Technologies, Increasing Returns, and Lock-In by Historical Events," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(394), pages 116-31, March.
  9. Krugman, Paul, 1987. "The narrow moving band, the Dutch disease, and the competitive consequences of Mrs. Thatcher : Notes on trade in the presence of dynamic scale economies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1-2), pages 41-55, October.
  10. Boggio, Luciano, 1996. "Growth and international competitiveness in a 'Kaldorian' perspective," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 299-320, September.
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