IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Determining the Effects of Central-Peripheral interactions on the Distribution of Human Activity in Space

  • António Rodrigues

    ()

Registered author(s):

    Natural advantages determine where agglomerations emerge. Also, efficiency and economies of scale determine how many agglomerations subsist and how they interact, forming complex urban hierarquies. Moreover, physical characteristics influence the way humans divide land into irregular parcels we call administrative regions. If, on one hand, initial location advantages are responsible for defining where the main urban nodes will grow and subsist because of lock-in effects, central-peripheral relations play a decisive role in defining the distribution of activity in space. This paper explores the importance of location in relation to the main centripetal nodes. A central-peripheral model, taking into account spatial heterogeneity patterns, explains how activity is organized in Continental Portugal. A bayesian framework will allow the comparison of posterior densities for distinct parts of the country.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa11/e110830aFinal01586.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa11p1586.

    as
    in new window

    Length:
    Date of creation: Sep 2011
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa11p1586
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Welthandelsplatz 1, 1020 Vienna, Austria
    Web page: http://www.ersa.org

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Ellison, G. & Glaeser, E.L., 1994. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Working papers 94-27, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    2. Manishi Prasad & Peter Wahlqvist & Rich Shikiar & Ya-Chen Tina Shih, 2004. "A," PharmacoEconomics, Springer Healthcare | Adis, vol. 22(4), pages 225-244.
    3. Gabaix, Xavier & Ioannides, Yannis M., 2004. "The evolution of city size distributions," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: J. V. Henderson & J. F. Thisse (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 53, pages 2341-2378 Elsevier.
    4. Andrew K. Copus, 2001. "From Core-periphery to Polycentric Development: Concepts of Spatial and Aspatial Peripherality," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(4), pages 539-552, June.
    5. Riccardo regstdcenzi, 2009. "Undermining the Principle of Concentration? European Union Regional Policy and the Socio-economic Disadvantage of European Regions," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(1), pages 111-133.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa11p1586. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gunther Maier)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.