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Barter, Credit, and Welfare: A theoretical inquiry into the barter phenomenon in Russia

Author

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  • Jos?? Noguera

    ()

  • Susan J. Linz

    ()

Abstract

This paper develops a model to investigate the welfare implications of barter in Russia and other transition economies during the 1990s. We argue that barter is a welfare-improving phenomenon that acts as a defense mechanism against monetary instability. When firms react to tighter credit markets by switching to barter, the risk they face diminishes, allowing for a higher level of production.

Suggested Citation

  • Jos?? Noguera & Susan J. Linz, 2005. "Barter, Credit, and Welfare: A theoretical inquiry into the barter phenomenon in Russia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp757, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2005-757
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/40143/3/wp757.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dalia Marin & Monika Schnitzer, 2003. "Creating Creditworthiness through Reciprocal Trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 159-174, February.
    2. Saul Estrin & Alan A. Bevan & Boris Kuznetsov & Mark E. Schaffer & Manuela Angelucci & Julian Fennema & Giovanni Mangiarotti, 2001. "The Determinants of Privatised Enterprise Performance in Russia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 452, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    3. Dalia Marin, 2002. "Trust versus illusion: What is driving demonetization in the former Soviet Union?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 10(1), pages 173-200, March.
    4. Brian Pinto & Vladimir Drebentsov & Alexander Morozov, 2000. "Give Macroeconomic Stability and Growth in Russia a Chance," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 8(2), pages 297-324, July.
    5. Brana, S. & Maurel, M., 1999. "Barter in Russia : Liquidity Shortage Versus Lack of Restructuring," Papiers d'Economie Mathématique et Applications 1999.98, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
    6. Dalia Marin & Daniel Kaufmann & Bogdan Gorochowskij, 2000. "Barter in Transition Economies: Competing Explanations Confront Ukranian Data," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 287, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    7. Susan J Linz & Gary Krueger, 1998. "Enterprise Restructuring in Russia's Transition Economy: Formal and Informal Mechanisms," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 40(2), pages 5-52, July.
    8. Marin, Dalia & Huang, Haizhou & Xu, Chenggang, 2002. "Financial Crisis, Economic Recovery and Banking Development in Former Soviet Union Economies," Discussion Papers in Economics 27, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    9. Pyle, William, 2002. "Overbanked and Credit-Starved: A Paradox of the Transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 25-50, March.
    10. Susan Linz, 2000. "Restructuring with What Success? A Case Study of Russian Firms," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 324, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    11. Marvasti, A. & Smyth, David J., 1999. "The effect of barter on the demand for money: an empirical analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 73-80, July.
    12. Commander, Simon & Dolinskaya, Irina & Mumssen, Christian, 2002. "Determinants of barter in Russia: an empirical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 275-307, April.
    13. Andrei Yakovlev, 2000. "Barter in the Russian Economy: Classifications and Implications (Evidence from Case Study Analyses)," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 279-291.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Barter; welfare; Russia; money; credit; payment system; interest rate;

    JEL classification:

    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General
    • P21 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population
    • P26 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Political Economy

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