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What are the causes of the growing trend of excess savings of the corporate sector in developed countries ? an empirical analysis of three hypotheses

  • Brufman, Leandro
  • Martinez, Lisana
  • Artica, Rodrigo Perez

This paper analyzes annual accounting data for a sample of 5,000 publicly traded manufacturing firms from Germany, France, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom. The analysis uses data from 1997 to 2011 and finds an increasing trend of excess savings (defined as the difference between gross saving and capital formation) and a gradual decline of gross capital formation. This trend is accompanied by a steady deleveraging process and a decrease in the share of operating assets in total assets. This process is more acute among the more credit constrained, the more volatile, and the less dynamic firms.

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Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 6571.

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Date of creation: 01 Aug 2013
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6571
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  1. DeAngelo, Harry & DeAngelo, Linda & Skinner, Douglas J., 2004. "Are dividends disappearing? Dividend concentration and the consolidation of earnings," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(3), pages 425-456, June.
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  8. Kahle, Kathleen M. & Stulz, Rene M., 2012. "Access to Capital, Investment, and the Financial Crisis," Working Paper Series 2012-02, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
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  12. Brown, Gregory & Kapadia, Nishad, 2007. "Firm-specific risk and equity market development," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 358-388, May.
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  14. Arvind Krishnamurthy & Annette Vissing-Jorgensen, 2007. "The Demand for Treasury Debt," NBER Working Papers 12881, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Eugene F. Fama, 2002. "Testing Trade-Off and Pecking Order Predictions About Dividends and Debt," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(1), pages 1-33, March.
  16. Steven X. Wei & Chu Zhang, 2006. "Why Did Individual Stocks Become More Volatile?," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 79(1), pages 259-292, January.
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