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Cargo dwell time in Durban : lessons for Sub-Saharan African ports

Author

Listed:
  • Kgare, Tshepo
  • Raballand, Gael
  • Ittmann, Hans W.

Abstract

Based on quantitative and qualitative data, this paper attempts to identify the main reasons why cargo dwell time in Durban port has dramatically reduced in the past decade to a current average of 3-4 days. A major customs reform; changes in port storage tariffs coupled with strict enforcement; massive investments in infrastructure and equipment; and changing customer behavior through contractualization between the port operator and shipping lines or between customs, importers, and brokers have all played a major role. The main lesson for Sub-Saharan Africa that can be drawn from Durban is that cargo dwell time is mainly a function of the characteristics of the private sector, but it is the onus of public sector players, such as customs and the port authority, to put pressure on the private sector to make more efficient use of the port and reduce cargo dwell time.

Suggested Citation

  • Kgare, Tshepo & Raballand, Gael & Ittmann, Hans W., 2011. "Cargo dwell time in Durban : lessons for Sub-Saharan African ports," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5794, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5794
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Waldo Krugell & Marianne Matthee, 2009. "Measuring the export capability of South African regions," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(3), pages 459-476.
    2. Imraan Valodia & Myriam Velia, 2006. "Macro--Micro Linkages in Trade: Trade, Efficiency and Competitiveness of Manufacturing Firms in Durban, South Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(4), pages 688-721, December.
    3. Jean-François Arvis & Gaël Raballand & Jean-François Marteau, 2010. "The Cost of Being Landlocked : Logistics Costs and Supply Chain Reliability," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2489, June.
    4. Refas, Salim & Cantens, Thomas, 2011. "Why Does cargo spend weeks in African ports ? the case of Douala, Cameroon," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5565, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Porteous, Obie C., 2015. "High Trade Costs and Their Consequences: An Estimated Model of African Agricultural Storage and Trade," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205776, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Transport and Trade Logistics; Common Carriers Industry; Ports&Waterways; Airports and Air Services;

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