IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/4878.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Local sources of financing for infrastructure in Africa : a cross-country analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Irving, Jacqueline
  • Manroth, Astrid

Abstract

With the exception of South Africa, local financial markets in sub-Saharan Africa remain underdeveloped and small, with a particular dearth of financing with maturity terms commensurate with the medium- to long-term horizons of infrastructure projects. But as financial market reforms gather momentum, there is growing awareness of the need to tap local and regional sources. Drawing on a comprehensive new database constructed for the purpose of this research, the paper assesses the actual and potential role of local financial systems for 24 African countries in financing infrastructure. The paper concludes that further development and more appropriate regulation of local institutional investors would help them realize their potential as financing sources, for which they are better suited than local banks because their liabilities would better match the longer terms of infrastructure projects. There are clear signs of positive change: private pension providers are emerging in Africa, there is a shift from defined benefit toward defined contribution plans, and African institutional investors have begun taking a more diversified portfolio approach in asset allocation. Although capital markets remain underdeveloped, new issuers in infrastructure sectors-particularly of corporate bonds-are coming to market in several countries, in some cases constituting the debut issue. More than half of the corporate bonds listed at end-2006 on these countries'markets were by companies in infrastructure sectors. More cross-border listings and investment within the region-in both corporate bonds and equity issues-including by local institutional investors, could help overcome local capital markets'impediments and may hold significant promise for financing cross-country infrastructure projects.

Suggested Citation

  • Irving, Jacqueline & Manroth, Astrid, 2009. "Local sources of financing for infrastructure in Africa : a cross-country analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4878, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4878
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2009/03/27/000158349_20090327160051/Rendered/PDF/WPS4878.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Patrick Honohan & Thorsten Beck, 2007. "Making Finance Work for Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6626.
    2. Calvin A McDonald & Liliana B Schumacher, 2007. "Financial Deepening in Sub-Saharan Africa; Empirical Evidence on the Role of Creditor Rights Protection and Information Sharing," IMF Working Papers 07/203, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Ross Levine, 1997. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: Views and Agenda," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(2), pages 688-726, June.
    4. Huw Pill & Mahmood Pradhan, 1995. "Financial Indicators and Financial Change in Africa and Asia," IMF Working Papers 95/123, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Valeriano F. García & Lin Liu, 1999. "Macroeconomic Determinants of Stock Market Development," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 2, pages 29-59, May.
    6. Enrique A Gelbard & Sérgio Pereira. Leite, 1999. "Measuring Financial Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," IMF Working Papers 99/105, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Inderst, Georg & Stewart, Fiona, 2014. "Institutional Investment in Infrastructure in Emerging Markets and Developing Economies," MPRA Paper 62522, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Anton Eberhard & Orvika Rosnes & Maria Shkaratan & Haakon Vennemo, 2011. "Africa's Power Infrastructure : Investment, Integration, Efficiency," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2290.
    3. Peter Draper & Andreas Freytag & Sören Scholvin & Luong Thanh Tran, 2016. "Is a ‘Factory Southern Africa’ Feasible?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23788, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Debt Markets; Banks&Banking Reform; Access to Finance; Emerging Markets;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4878. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.