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The impact of regional liberalization and harmonization in road transport services : a focus on Zambia and lessons for landlocked countries

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  • Raballand, Gael
  • Kunaka, Charles
  • Giersing, Bo

Abstract

Based on a detailed empirical study, this paper argues that regional liberalization of trucking services has had an important effect on transport costs and tariffs for Zambia's economy. Zambia is a peculiar example in Southern Africa as it benefits from relatively low transport costs compared with other landlocked countries in Africa. This is mainly because of competition between Zambian and other regional, mainly South African, operators and because of South African investments in Zambia's trucking industry. As a result, the costs of operators registered in Zambia and South Africa are similar. The study also demonstrates that enhancing trucking interoperability in Southern Africa would significantly impact positively the Zambian trucking industry's competitiveness. The main measures to significantly increase trucking competitiveness in the region would more likely derive from reducing fuel costs in Zambia, improving border-post operations, and relaxing South African truck import rules.

Suggested Citation

  • Raballand, Gael & Kunaka, Charles & Giersing, Bo, 2008. "The impact of regional liberalization and harmonization in road transport services : a focus on Zambia and lessons for landlocked countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4482, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4482
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. MacKellar, Landis & Woergoetter, Andreas & Woerz, Julia, 2000. "Economic Development Problems of Landlocked Countries," Transition Economics Series 14, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    2. David Kaplan, 2004. "Manufacturing in South Africa over the last decade: a review of industrial performance and policy," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 623-644.
    3. Jean-François Arvis & Gaël Raballand & Jean-François Marteau, 2010. "The Cost of Being Landlocked : Logistics Costs and Supply Chain Reliability," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2489.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2009. "Zambia Second Investment Climate Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 28066, The World Bank.
    2. Raballand, Gael & Bridges, Kate & Beuran, Monica & Sacks, Audrey, 2013. "Does the semi-autonomous agency model function in a low-governance environment ? the case of the road development agency in Zambia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6585, The World Bank.
    3. Monica Beuran & Marie Gachassin & Gaël Raballand, 2015. "Are There Myths on Road Impact and Transport in Sub-Saharan Africa?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 33(5), pages 673-700, September.
    4. Borchert, Ingo & Gootiiz, Batshur & Grover, Arti & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2012. "Landlocked or policy locked ? how services trade protection deepens economic isolation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5942, The World Bank.
    5. Borko Handjiski & Lazar Sestovic, 2011. "Barriers to Trade in Services in the CEFTA Region," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2337.
    6. Charles Kunaka & Gaël Raballand & Mike Fitzmaurice, 2016. "How trucking services have improved and may contribute to economic development: The case of East Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 152, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Thando Vilakazi & Anthea Paelo, 2017. "Understanding intra-regional transport: Competition in road transportation between Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe," WIDER Working Paper Series 046, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Rural Roads&Transport; Roads&Highways; Common Carriers Industry; Transport and Trade Logistics;

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