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Economic Growth in Developing Countries: Is Landlockedness Destiny?

  • Ramesh Chandra Paudel

This paper examines the determinants of economic growth in developing countries within the standard growth regression framework, with special attention being paid to the experience of landlocked countries. The results confirm the findings of previous studies that landlockedness hampers economic growth, but the magnitude of negative impact is sensitive to alternative estimation methods. However, the analysis suggests that good governance, trade-openness, and coordinating infrastructure development with neighbours explain the significant aspect of the inter-country differences in growth rates among landlocked developing countries (LLDCs). The results also suggest that African landlocked are not different from the other LLDCs. Contrary to the 'resource-curse' hypothesis, natural resources seem to contribute to economic growth of LLDCs.

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File URL: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/acde/publications/publish/papers/wp2014/wp_econ_2014_01.pdf
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Paper provided by The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics in its series Departmental Working Papers with number 2014-01.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pas:papers:2014-01
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