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Measuring the impact of the investment climate on total factor productivity : the cases of China and Brazil

Author

Listed:
  • Subramanian, Uma
  • Anderson, William P.
  • Lee, Kihoon

Abstract

This study measures the impact of investment climate factors on total factor productivity (TFP) of firms in Brazil and China. The analysis is conducted in two steps: first an econometric production function is estimated to produce a measure of TFP at the firm level. In the second step, variation in TFP across firms is statistically related to a indicators of the investment climate as well as firm characteristics. The results yield a number of insights about the factors underlying productivity. In both countries, and in a variety of industry groups, indicators of poor investment climate, especially delays in customs clearance and interruptions in utility services, have significant negative effects on TFP. Reducing customs clearance time by one day in China could increase TFP by 2-6 percent. Indicators such as email usage have positive effects on TFP. In the case of China, state-owned firms and firms located in the interior are shown to be much less productive than privately owned firms and firms located in the east. In Brazil, the results present an interesting contrast between the apparel industry and the electronics industry. In the apparel industry, older firms in competitive markets are more productive, while in the case of electronics, newer firms with higher market shares are more productive.

Suggested Citation

  • Subramanian, Uma & Anderson, William P. & Lee, Kihoon, 2005. "Measuring the impact of the investment climate on total factor productivity : the cases of China and Brazil," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3792, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3792
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Escribano, Alvaro & Guasch, J. Luis, 2005. "Assessing the impact of the investment climate on productivity using firm-level data : methodology and the cases of Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3621, The World Bank.
    2. Henri L. F. de Groot & Gert-Jan Linders & Piet Rietveld & Uma Subramanian, 2004. "The Institutional Determinants of Bilateral Trade Patterns," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(1), pages 103-123, February.
    3. Shirley, Chad & Winston, Clifford, 2004. "Firm inventory behavior and the returns from highway infrastructure investments," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 398-415, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yoshifumi Fukunaga & Ponciano Intal & Fukunari Kimura & Phoumin Han & Philippa Dee & Narjoko Dionisius & OUM Sothea, . "ASEAN Rising: ASEAN and AEC Beyond 2015," Books, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA), number 2013-rpr-01 edited by Yoshifumi Fukunaga & Ponciano Intal, Jr. & Fukunari Kimura & Phoumin Han & Philippa Dee & Narjoko Di.
    2. repec:ocp:dbbook:9-789954-971727 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Deininger, Klaus & Jin, Songqing & Sur, Mona, 2007. "Sri Lanka's Rural Non-Farm Economy: Removing Constraints to Pro-Poor Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 2056-2078, December.
    4. Ayadi, Rym & De Groen, Willem Pieter, 2014. "Micro-, Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises with High-Growth Potential in the Southern Mediterranean: Identifying Obstacles and Policy Responses," CEPS Papers 8796, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    5. Hausman, Warren H. & Lee, Hau L. & Subramanian, Uma, 2005. "Global logistics indicators, supply chain metrics, and bilateral trade patterns," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3773, The World Bank.

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    Keywords

    Economic Theory&Research; Technology Industry; Water and Industry; ICT Policy and Strategies; Economic Growth;

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