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Regional productivity in a multi-speed Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Don J. Webber

    () (University of the West of England, Bristol)

  • Min-Hua Jen

    (Imperial University)

  • Eoin O'Leary

    (University College Cork)

Abstract

This paper examines productivity dynamics at different spatial scales across European countries. Application of non-parametric simultaneous estimation techniques to a hierarchical dataset permits us to consider explicitly the extent to which the national-level is important for understanding regional-level productivity variation. The results show considerable national and regional level productivity variation which is not constant and evolves over time. There is divergence at all spatial scales and groups of regions that follow different growth trajectories with group membership not being confined by national borders. The results imply that policymakers need to take cognizance of the multi-layered economic geographies in which they are located. There are also group dynamics that challenge the dominance of the national economic positions and should be considered when shaping policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Don J. Webber & Min-Hua Jen & Eoin O'Leary, 2014. "Regional productivity in a multi-speed Europe," Working Papers 20141408, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20141408
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    File URL: http://www2.uwe.ac.uk/faculties/BBS/BUS/Research/Economics%20Papers%202014/1408.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier X., 1996. "Regional cohesion: Evidence and theories of regional growth and convergence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1325-1352, June.
    2. Bartkowska, Monika & Riedl, Aleksandra, 2012. "Regional convergence clubs in Europe: Identification and conditioning factors," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 22-31.
    3. Damien Neven & Claudine Gouymte, 1995. "Regional Convergence in the European Community," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 47-65, March.
    4. Luisa Corrado & Ron Martin & Melvyn Weeks, 2005. "Identifying and Interpreting Regional Convergence Clusters across Europe," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(502), pages 133-160, March.
    5. Borut Vojinović & Mariusz Próchniak, 2009. "Divergence Period in the European Convergence Process," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 15(4), pages 685-700, February.
    6. Nazrul Islam, 2003. "What have We Learnt from the Convergence Debate?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 309-362, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marco Socci, 2015. "Giovani e anziani nel mercato del lavoro tra solidarietà e conflitto," PRISMA Economia - Societ - Lavoro, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(3), pages 54-71.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Multi-level modelling; Regional productivity; Groups;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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