IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uta/papers/2012_04.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Heterodox Central Bankers: Eccles, Prebisch and Financial Reform in 1930s

Author

Listed:
  • Esteban Pérez Caldentey
  • Matias Vernengo

Abstract

The Great Depression led to a need to rethink the principles of central banking, as much as it had led to the rethinking of economics in general, with the Keynesian Revolution at the forefront of the theoretical changes. This paper suggests that the role of the monetary authority as a fiscal agent of government and the abandonment of the view of the economy as self-regulated were the central changes in central banking in the center. In addition, in the periphery central banks changed to try to insulate the worst effects of balance of payments crises and the use of capital controls became more common. Marriner S. Eccles, in the United States, and Raúl Prebisch, in Argentina, are paradigmatic examples of those new tendencies of central banking in the 1930s.

Suggested Citation

  • Esteban Pérez Caldentey & Matias Vernengo, 2012. "Heterodox Central Bankers: Eccles, Prebisch and Financial Reform in 1930s," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2012_04, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uta:papers:2012_04
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://economics.utah.edu/research/publications/2012_04.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Greg Hannsgen & Dimitri B. Papadimitriou, 2009. "Fiscal Stimulus, Job Creation, and the Economy: What Are the Lessons of the New Deal?," Economics Policy Note Archive 09-10, Levy Economics Institute.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Esteban Pérez Caldentey & Matías Vernengo, 2016. "Reading Keynes in Buenos Aires: Prebisch and the Dynamics of Capitalism," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(6), pages 1725-1741.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary Policy; Economic History; Heterodox Economics JEL Classification: B31; B50; E58; N10;

    JEL classification:

    • B31 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals - - - Individuals
    • B50 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - General
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uta:papers:2012_04. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deuutus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.