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Efficient communication in the electronic mail game

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  • K. de Jaegher

Abstract

The literature on the electronic mail game shows that players’ mutual expectations may lock them into requiring an inefficiently large number of confirmations and confirmations of confirmations from one another. This paper shows that this result hinges on the assumption that, with the exception of the first message, each player can only send a message when receiving an immediately preceding message. We show that, once this assumption is lifted, equilibria involving confirmations of confirmations no longer pass standard refinements of the Nash equilibrium, and are no longer evolutionary stable.

Suggested Citation

  • K. de Jaegher, 2007. "Efficient communication in the electronic mail game," Working Papers 07-11, Utrecht School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:use:tkiwps:0711
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:use:tkiwps:3131 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Kris De Jaegher, 2015. "Beneficial Long Communication in the Multiplayer Electronic Mail Game," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 233-251, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Electronic Mail Game; Efficient Communication; Grounding; Equilibrium Refinements; Evolutionary Stability;
    All these keywords.

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