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Structural Change, Technology, and Economic Growth: Brazil and the CIBS in a Comparative Perspective

  • Cimoli, Mario
  • Pereira, Wellington
  • Porcile, Gabriel
  • Scatolin, Fabio

Schumepterian growth theory stresses the role of structural change in long run growth. Countries which increase the share of technology-intensive sectors in their economic structures benefit more from technological learning and innovation. In addition, they are more able to respond to changes in the international markets and to enter in sectors whose demand grows at higher rates. The paper compares Brazil and the CIBS from the point of view of the direction and intensity of structural change. It is suggested that structural change has been relatively weak in Brazil and that this is associated with a less dynamic growth performance since the 1980s.

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File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/stc/repec/pdfs/rp2008/rp2008-105.pdf
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Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series Working Paper Series with number UNU-WIDER Research Paper RP2008/105.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:rp2008-105
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  1. Michael Peneder, 2004. "Tracing Empirical Trails of Schumpeterian Development," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2004-09, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  2. Fagerberg, Jan, 2000. "Technological progress, structural change and productivity growth: a comparative study," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 393-411, December.
  3. Krugman, Paul, 1989. "Differences in income elasticities and trends in real exchange rates," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 1031-1046, May.
  4. Narula,Rajneesh, 2004. "Understanding absorptive capacities in an "innovation systems" context: consequences for economic and employment growth," Research Memorandum 004, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  5. Fagerberg, Jan, 1994. "Technology and International Differences in Growth Rates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 1147-75, September.
  6. Sanjaya Lall (QEH), John Weiss and Jinkang Zhang, . "The 'Sophistication' Of Exports: A New Measure Of Product Characteristics," QEH Working Papers qehwps123, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
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