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Beyond Reforms : Structural Dynamics and Macroeconomic Vulnerability

  • José Antonio Ocampo
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    The book is organized in two parts. The first part looks at issues of long-term growth and development patterns, and the second part focuses on issues of macroeconomic vulnerability and its social effects. Chapter 1, looks at the determinants of dynamic efficiency in developing countries, which is seen as the result of two basic processes. Chapter 2, looks at the same issue from a slightly different angle: the combined effect of the technological gap relative to developed countries and the propensity to import. Chapter 3, takes as its starting point the inverted-U pattern followed by the share of manufacturing in total employment as a result of the process of structural change generated by increases in per capita income. Chapter 4, analyzes the social effects of structural reforms. Chapter 5, considers the determinants of business cycles. Chapter 6 explores a case of destabilization. Chapter 7, discusses debt sustainability issues; and the last chapter, deals with divergence and growth collapses, and serves to tie together the issues analyzed in both parts of the book.

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    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 7378 and published in 2005.
    ISBN: 0-8213-5819-7
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:7378
    Contact details of provider: Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
    Phone: (202) 477-1234
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    1. Robert J. Barro, 1999. "Inequality, Growth, and Investment," NBER Working Papers 7038, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Sergio Rebelo, 1999. "Long Run Policy Analysis and Long Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2114, David K. Levine.
    3. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1991. "A sensitivity analysis of cross-country growth regressions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 609, The World Bank.
    4. Rodriguez, Francisco & Sachs, Jeffrey D, 1999. " Why Do Resource-Abundant Economies Grow More Slowly?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 277-303, September.
    5. Birdsall, Nancy & Ross, David & Sabot, Richard, 1995. "Inequality and Growth Reconsidered: Lessons from East Asia," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 9(3), pages 477-508, September.
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    7. Alesina, Alberto & Perotti, Roberto, 1994. "The Political Economy of Growth: A Critical Survey of the Recent Literature," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(3), pages 351-71, September.
    8. Quah, Danny, 1993. "Galton's Fallacy and Tests of the Convergence Hypothesis," CEPR Discussion Papers 820, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. repec:oup:qjecon:v:107:y:1992:i:2:p:407-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 1997. "The poverty of nations: a quantitative exploration," Staff Report 204, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    11. Alesina, Alberto F & Rodrik, Dani, 1991. "Distributive Politics and Economic Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 565, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Klenow, Peter J. & Rodriguez-Clare, Andres, 1997. "Economic growth: A review essay," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 597-617, December.
    13. repec:oup:restud:v:60:y:1993:i:1:p:35-52 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:oup:qjecon:v:114:y:1999:i:3:p:1025-1045 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Corden, W Max & Neary, J Peter, 1982. "Booming Sector and De-Industrialisation in a Small Open Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(368), pages 825-48, December.
    16. Rodrik, Dani, 1999. " Where Did All the Growth Go? External Shocks, Social Conflict, and Growth Collapses," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 385-412, December.
    17. L. Wade, 1988. "Review," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 99-100, July.
    18. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker Than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116, February.
    19. repec:oup:qjecon:v:110:y:1995:i:4:p:1127-70 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. repec:oup:qjecon:v:114:y:1999:i:1:p:83-116 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. repec:oup:qjecon:v:109:y:1994:i:2:p:465-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1990. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 3541, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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