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Developing internationally comparable indicators for the commercialization of publicly-funded research

Author

Listed:
  • Arundel, Anthony

    () (UNU-MERIT)

  • Bordoy, Catalina

    () (UNU-MERIT)

Abstract

It is a common perception that European public-funded research fails to commercialize their discoveries, in contrast to the perceived success of their American counterparts. This resulted in policies aimed at improving the commercialization of European publicly-funded research, including the establishment of Technology Transfer Offices (TTOs). Recent surveys on the activities of these TTOs show that although European public-funded research lags behind the United States in patent applications and grants, they produce more start-ups, and have comparable results for the number of licenses executed. Steps to improve the international comparability of TTO surveys could provide useful new indicators for policy development. However, this will also require indicators for knowledge transfer through informal 'open science' methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Arundel, Anthony & Bordoy, Catalina, 2008. "Developing internationally comparable indicators for the commercialization of publicly-funded research," MERIT Working Papers 075, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2008075
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2008/wp2008-075.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stéphane Malo & Aldo Geuna, 2000. "Science-Technology Linkages in an Emerging Research Platform: The Case of Combinatorial Chemistry and Biology," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 47(2), pages 303-321, February.
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    5. Phan, Phillip H. & Siegel, Donald S., 2006. "The Effectiveness of University Technology Transfer," Foundations and Trends(R) in Entrepreneurship, now publishers, vol. 2(2), pages 77-144, November.
    6. Lockett, Andy & Wright, Mike, 2005. "Resources, capabilities, risk capital and the creation of university spin-out companies," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(7), pages 1043-1057, September.
    7. Ajay Agrawal & Rebecca Henderson, 2002. "Putting Patents in Context: Exploring Knowledge Transfer from MIT," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 48(1), pages 44-60, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pontus Braunerhjelm, 2007. "Academic entrepreneurship: Social norms, university culture and policies," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(9), pages 619-631, November.
    2. Harvey Goldstein & Edward Bergman & Gunther Maier, 2011. "Comparing U.S. and European Views of University Involvement in Economic Development," ERSA conference papers ersa11p301, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Haeussler, Carolin & Colyvas, Jeannette A., 2011. "Breaking the Ivory Tower: Academic Entrepreneurship in the Life Sciences in UK and Germany," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 41-54, February.
    4. Roessner, David & Bond, Jennifer & Okubo, Sumiye & Planting, Mark, 2013. "The economic impact of licensed commercialized inventions originating in university research," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 23-34.
    5. Ekaterina Bjørnåli & Magnus Gulbrandsen, 2010. "Exploring board formation and evolution of board composition in academic spin-offs," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 92-112, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public R&D; Commericalization; Research Indicators; Open Science; Europe;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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