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The concept of structural economic vulnerability and its relevance for the identification of the Least Developed Countries and other purposes

Author

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  • Patrick Guillaumont

Abstract

This paper was prepared by Professor Patrick Guillaumont, as a contribution to the expert group meeting of the Committee for Development Policy on climate change, conflict and other issues related to the review of the criteria for the identification of least developed countries (LDCs) which took place in New York, 2-3 February 2011. Structural economic vulnerability is a major obstacle for the development of LDCs. The paper discusses the conceptual, methodological and empirical issues related to the economic vulnerability index (EVI) developed and used by the Committee for Development Policy (CDP) in the identification of LDCs. The note also addresses the relation between physical and economic vulnerability to climate change as well as the role of the EVI in allocating official development aid and as tool for development research.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick Guillaumont, 2011. "The concept of structural economic vulnerability and its relevance for the identification of the Least Developed Countries and other purposes," CDP Background Papers 012, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
  • Handle: RePEc:une:cpaper:012
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    File URL: http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/policy/cdp/cdp_background_papers/bp2011_12.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jacky Amprou & Patrick Guillaumont & Sylviane Guillaumont Jeanneney, 2007. "Aid Selectivity According to Augmented Criteria," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(5), pages 733-763, May.
    2. Patrick GUILLAUMONT & Sylviane GUILLAUMONT JEANNENEY, 2009. "State fragility and economic vulnerability: What is measured and why?," Working Papers P07, FERDI.
    3. Patrick Guillaumont, 2009. "An Economic Vulnerability Index: Its Design and Use for International Development Policy," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 193-228.
    4. Patrick Guillaumont, 2010. "Assessing the Economic Vulnerability of Small Island Developing States and the Least Developed Countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(5), pages 828-854.
    5. Joël CARIOLLE, 2011. "The Economic Vulnerability Index - 2010 Update," Working Papers I09, FERDI.
    6. Benno Ferrarini, 2009. "Policy, vulnerability and the new debt sustainability framework," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(7), pages 895-914.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sena Kimm GNANGNON, 2012. "Does Structural Economic Vulnerability Matter for Public Indebtedness in Developing Countries?," Working Papers 201236, CERDI.
    2. Sena Kimm GNANGNON, 2012. "Structural Vulnerability and Excessive Public Indebtedness in CFA Franc Zone Countries," Working Papers 201237, CERDI.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conflict; economic vulnerability; least-developed countries; climate change;

    JEL classification:

    • F5 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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