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The Global Governance of Capital Flows: New Opportunities, Enduring Challenges


  • Kevin Gallagher


International capital mobility has long been associated with financial and banking crises. The Articles of Agreement of the International Monetary Fund contain multi-lateral rules to govern global capital flows. For some countries, especially those in the developing world, the IMF Articles of Agreement remain the core framework under which they have autonomy to regulate cross-border capital flows. For others, these rules have been partly superseded by more recent trade and other economic integration agreements. Thus what used to be a regime of ‘cooperative decentralization’ has become a patchwork of overlapping and inconsistent governance structures that pose significant challenges to nations attempting to regulate global capital flows for stability and growth. This paper traces the history of governing global capital flows and presents a framework for understanding three distinct eras in the modern governance of global capital. The framework emphasizes how power, interests, ideas, and institutions interact to shape each era in different combinations to yield different outcomes. From this perspective, there are many challenges ahead for effectively governing global capital flows.

Suggested Citation

  • Kevin Gallagher, 2012. "The Global Governance of Capital Flows: New Opportunities, Enduring Challenges," Working Papers wp283, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp283

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Valckx, Nico, 2004. "WTO financial services commitments: Determinants and impact on financial stability," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 517-541.
    2. Joseph P. Joyce & Ilan Noy, 2008. "The IMF and the Liberalization of Capital Flows," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(3), pages 413-430, August.
    3. Ruggie, John Gerard, 1982. "International regimes, transactions, and change: embedded liberalism in the postwar economic order," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(02), pages 379-415, March.
    4. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    5. Alexei P Kireyev, 2002. "Liberalization of Trade in Financial Services and Financial Sector Stability (Analytical Approach)," IMF Working Papers 02/138, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Reinhart, Karmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. ""This time is different": panorama of eight centuries of financial crises," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 77-114, March.
    7. Jeffrey M. Chwieroth, 2010. "Capital Ideas: The IMF and the Rise of Financial Liberalization," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9087.
    8. repec:aei:rpbook:52510 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Jagdish N. Bhagwati, 2004. "In Defense of Globalization: It Has a Human Face," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 94(6), pages 9-20, November-.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kevin Gallagher & Guillermo Lagarda Cuevas & Jennifer Linares, 2017. "Capital Openness and Income Inequality: Smooth Sailing or Troubled Waters?," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8589, Inter-American Development Bank.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E65 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Studies of Particular Policy Episodes
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development

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