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Sovereign Defaults, Domestic Credit Market Institutions and Credit to the Private Sector


  • Guido Sandleris


During sovereign debt crises, even after controlling for the decline in relevant macroeconomic variables, both foreign and domestic credit to the private sector decline. This paper presents a mechanism through which sovereign defaults can lead to this decline, even if domestic agents do not hold government debt. The mechanism highlights the interaction between sovereign defaults, domestic credit market institutions and firms’ collateral constraints. In developing countries firms are usually collateral constrained. In a model with endogenous sovereign debt, a sovereign default, through its effect on expectations about fundamentals, affects the value of the firms’ international and domestic collateral, which limits the availability of foreign and domestic credit. The model also shows that, by attracting private capital flows to the private sector, stronger domestic financial institutions reduce governments’ incentives to default, which, in turn, facilitate public borrowing.

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  • Guido Sandleris, 2010. "Sovereign Defaults, Domestic Credit Market Institutions and Credit to the Private Sector," Business School Working Papers 2010-01, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.
  • Handle: RePEc:udt:wpbsdt:2010-01

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    12. Sandleris, Guido, 2008. "Sovereign defaults: Information, investment and credit," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 267-275, December.
    13. Fernando Broner & Jaume Ventura, 2016. "Rethinking the Effects of Financial Globalization," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 131(3), pages 1497-1542.
    14. Christoph Trebesch, 2009. "The Cost of Aggressive Sovereign Debt Policies; How Much is theprivate Sector Affected?," IMF Working Papers 09/29, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Viral V. Acharya & Raghuram G. Rajan, 2013. "Sovereign Debt, Government Myopia, and the Financial Sector," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 26(6), pages 1526-1560.
    2. Nicola Gennaioli & Alberto Martin & Stefano Rossi, 2014. "Sovereign Default, Domestic Banks, and Financial Institutions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(2), pages 819-866, April.
    3. Rui Esteves & João Tovar Jalles, 2016. "Like Father Like Sons? The Cost of Sovereign Defaults in Reduced Credit to the Private Sector," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(7), pages 1515-1545, October.
    4. Polat, Tandogan, 2016. "Essays on banking sector’s dynamics, expectations, preferences and impact," Other publications TiSEM d064f029-f91e-47bc-b6d3-0, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    5. Patrick Bolton & Olivier Jeanne, 2011. "Sovereign Default Risk and Bank Fragility in Financially Integrated Economies," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(2), pages 162-194, June.
    6. repec:eee:dyncon:v:83:y:2017:i:c:p:1-17 is not listed on IDEAS

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