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Labor Supply Responses to Chronic Illness in Senegal

Listed author(s):
  • Virginie Comblon
  • Karine Marazyan

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File URL: https://umr-developpement-societes.univ-paris1.fr/fileadmin/UMRDS/Working_Papers/WP6.17_-_Labor_Supply_Responses_to_Chronic_Illness_in_Senegal.pdf
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Paper provided by Université Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne, UMR Développement et Sociétés in its series Working Papers with number 20170006.

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Date of creation: 2017
Handle: RePEc:uds:wpaper:20170006
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://umr-developpement-societes.univ-paris1.fr/menu-haut/publications/working-papers-ds/

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  1. Esther Duflo, 2012. "Women Empowerment and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1051-1079, December.
  2. Philippe De Vreyer & Sylvie Lambert & Abla Safir & Momar Sylla, 2008. "Pauvreté et Structure Familiale. Pourquoi une nouvelle enquête ?," Post-Print hal-01399214, HAL.
  3. Lambert, Sylvie & Rossi, Pauline, 2016. "Sons as widowhood insurance: Evidence from Senegal," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 113-127.
  4. Beegle, Kathleen, 2005. "Labor Effects of Adult Mortality in Tanzanian Households," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(3), pages 655-683, April.
  5. Caroli, Eve & Weber-Baghdiguian, Lexane, 2016. "Self-reported health and gender: The role of social norms," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 220-229.
  6. Alberto Abadie, 2005. "Semiparametric Difference-in-Differences Estimators," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(1), pages 1-19.
  7. Wagstaff, Adam, 2007. "The economic consequences of health shocks: Evidence from Vietnam," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 82-100, January.
  8. Jonathan Robinson & Ethan Yeh, 2011. "Transactional Sex as a Response to Risk in Western Kenya," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 35-64, January.
  9. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  10. Joachim De Weerdt & Marcel Fafchamps, 2011. "Social Identity and the Formation of Health Insurance Networks," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(8), pages 1152-1177, June.
  11. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Kleinjans, Kristin J. & Larsen, Mona, 2015. "The effect of a severe health shock on work behavior: Evidence from different health care regimes," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 136, pages 44-51.
  12. Paul Gertler & Jonathan Gruber, 2002. "Insuring Consumption Against Illness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 51-70, March.
  13. Stefan Dercon, 2002. "Income Risk, Coping Strategies, and Safety Nets," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 141-166, September.
  14. Ashenfelter, Orley & Card, David, 1985. "Using the Longitudinal Structure of Earnings to Estimate the Effect of Training Programs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(4), pages 648-660, November.
  15. Islam, Asadul & Maitra, Pushkar, 2012. "Health shocks and consumption smoothing in rural households: Does microcredit have a role to play?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 232-243.
  16. Philippe De Vreyer & Björn Nilsson, 2016. "When Solidarity Fails: Heterogeneous Effects of Orphanhood in Senegalese Households," Working Papers DT/2016/17, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
  17. Maria Eugenia Genoni, 2012. "Health Shocks and Consumption Smoothing: Evidence from Indonesia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(3), pages 475-506.
  18. Audibert, Martine & Etard, Jean-Francois, 2003. "Productive Benefits after Investment in Health in Mali," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(3), pages 769-782, April.
  19. Abegunde, Dele Olawale & Stanciole, Anderson E., 2008. "The economic impact of chronic diseases: How do households respond to shocks? Evidence from Russia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(11), pages 2296-2307, June.
  20. Sauerborn, R. & Adams, A. & Hien, M., 1996. "Household strategies to cope with the economic costs of illness," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 291-301, August.
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