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Sequential Bargaining, Land Assembly, and the Holdout Problem

Author

Listed:
  • Thomas J. Miceli

    (University of Connecticut)

  • Kathleen Segerson

    (University of Connecticut)

Abstract

Although the holdout problem is a well-established part of legal and economic lore, the exact source of the problem is not well understood. The problem is usually attributed to high transaction costs or excessive bargaining power on the part of sellers once they recognize the scope of the project. In an effort to isolate the essential features of the problem, this paper considers the simplest possible setting in which a buyer bargains sequentially with a series of sellers, each of whose land is necessary to realize the gain from a large-scale project. Using ordinary Nash bargaining and assuming complete information, we identify a minimum set of factors that give rise to a holdout problem, which highlight the importance of commitment and the inefficiency of partial assembly.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas J. Miceli & Kathleen Segerson, 2011. "Sequential Bargaining, Land Assembly, and the Holdout Problem," Working papers 2011-13, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2011-13
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Miceli, 2014. "The color of law: an economic theory of legal boundaries," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 185-209, October.
    2. Isaac, R. Mark & Kitchens, Carl & Portillo, Javier E., 2016. "Can buyer “mobility” reduce aggregation failures in land-assembly?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 16-30.
    3. repec:bpj:ajlecn:v:8:y:2017:i:2:p:16:n:5 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Kitchens, Carl & Roomets, Alex, 2015. "Dealing with eminent domain," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 22-31.
    5. Göller, Daniel & Hewer, Michael, 2015. "Breakdown in multilateral negotiations," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 478-484.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bargaining; holdout problem; land assembly;

    JEL classification:

    • D40 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - General
    • K11 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - Property Law
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns

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