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Motivation, expectations and the gender pay gap for UK graduates

Author

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  • Arnaud Chevalier

Abstract

Focussing on recent UK graduates, a wage gap of 12% is found. The unexplained component of the gap is small and a large fraction of the gap can be explained by subject choice, job characteristics, motivation and expectation variables. Motivation and expectations account for 44% of the explained gap, thus most studies over-estimate the unexplained component of the gender wage gap. Following stereotypes, women tend to be more altruistic and less career oriented than men, character traits that are less rewarded by employers. The principal component of the gender wage gap is expectations about childrearing. These conservative attitudes affect women’s wages even at an early stage of their career. Without a change in attitude, the gender wage gap is likely to remain.

Suggested Citation

  • Arnaud Chevalier, 2004. "Motivation, expectations and the gender pay gap for UK graduates," Working Papers 200403, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:200403
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/1310
    File Function: First version, 2004
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    Cited by:

    1. Redmond, Paul & McGuinness, Seamus, 2017. "The Gender Wage Gap in Europe: Job Preferences, Gender Convergence and Distributional Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 10933, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Alison L. Booth, 2006. "The Glass Ceiling in Europe: Why Are Women Doing Badly in the Labour Market?," CEPR Discussion Papers 542, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. Maciej Bukowski & Grzegorz Koloch & Piotr Lewandowski & Anna Baranowska & Iga Magda & Arkadiusz Szydlowski & Jacek Bielinski & Magdalena Bober & Malgorzata Sarzalska & Julian Zawistowski, 2008. "Employment in Poland 2007. Security on a Flexible Labour Market," Books and Reports published by IBS, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych, number zwp2007 edited by Maciej Bukowski.
    4. Nils Braakmann, 2009. "The Role of Psychological Traits for the Gender Gap in Full-Time Employment and Wages: Evidence from Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 162, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Marija Andonova & Nikica Mojsoska-Blazevski, 2015. "Factors Influencing the Earnings Expectations among Macedonian Students: A Comparative Perspective with the EU Students," Croatian Economic Survey, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb, vol. 17(1), pages 71-110, June.
    6. Alan Manning & Joanna Swaffield, 2008. "The gender gap in early-career wage growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(530), pages 983-1024, July.
    7. Cepeda Emiliani, Laura & Barón, Juan D., 2012. "Educational Segregation and the Gender Wage Gap for Recent College Graduates in Colombia," IZA Discussion Papers 6361, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Iga Magda & Monika Potoczna, 2014. "Does flexible employment pay? European evidence on the wage perspectives of female workers," IBS Working Papers 3/2014, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    9. Claudio Quintano & Rosalia Castellano & Antonella Rocca, 2010. "Male-female discrimination: an analysis of gender gap and its determinants," Statistica, Department of Statistics, University of Bologna, vol. 70(2), pages 171-190.
    10. Booth, Alison L., 2009. "Gender and competition," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 599-606, December.
    11. Nigel C. O’Leary & Peter J. Sloane, 2005. "The Return to a University Education in Great Britain," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 193(1), pages 75-89, July.
    12. Joanna K. Swaffield, 2007. "Estimates Of The Impact Of Labour Market Attachment And Attitudes On The Female Wage," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 75(3), pages 349-371, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender wage gap; Attitude; Wages--College graduates--Great Britain; Wages--Sex differences--Great Britain; Wage differentials--Great Britain; Sex discrimination in employment;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J70 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - General
    • J29 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Other
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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