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Does flexible employment pay? European evidence on the wage perspectives of female workers

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  • Iga Magda
  • Monika Potoczna

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to explore three issues relating to the financial dimension of female labour market outcomes. Firstly we analyze the gender pay differentials, adding to the existing literature an age - and distribution specific gender pay gaps. Next, we investigate the wage returns associated with two flexible types of employment, namely temporary and part time jobs. Our results show that flexible employment forms offer no consistent pattern of age-specific wage returns. Eastern and Western European countries differ in some aspects: young women in the former experience much larger pay gaps at the beginning of their working careers (compared to men), and their wage penalties associated with fixed term contracts tend to increase with age. Part time work appears to be beneficial mainly for the high paid women.

Suggested Citation

  • Iga Magda & Monika Potoczna, 2014. "Does flexible employment pay? European evidence on the wage perspectives of female workers," IBS Working Papers 3/2014, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibt:wpaper:wp032014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Paola Naddeo, 2015. "The Wage Effects Of Fixed-Term Contracts," RIEDS - Rivista Italiana di Economia, Demografia e Statistica - Italian Review of Economics, Demography and Statistics, SIEDS Societa' Italiana di Economia Demografia e Statistica, vol. 69(4), pages 63-72, October-D.
    2. Ewa Cukrowska-Torzewska & Anna Lovasz, 2017. "The Impact of Parenthood on the Gender Wage Gap – a Comparative Analysis of 26 European Countries," Working Papers 2017-25, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    3. Jan Baran & Atilla Bartha & Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak & Olena Fedyuk & Agnieszka Kaminska & Piotr Lewandowski & Maciej Lis & Iga Magda & Monika Potoczna & Violetta Zentai, 2014. "Women on the European Labour Market," IBS Policy Papers 4/2014, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    4. Piotr Lewandowski & Agnieszka Kaminska, 2015. "In-Work Poverty in Poland: Diagnosis and Possible Remedies," IBS Research Reports 01/2015, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender pay gap; Part-time work;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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