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Child Poverty in Armenia: National Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Lucia Ferrone
  • Yekaterina Chzhen
  • UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti

Abstract

This report provides the first comprehensive national estimates of multidimensional child poverty in Armenia, measured using UNICEF’s Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA) methodology. Dimensions and indicators for three age groups (0-5, 6-14 and 15-17) were selected as the result of a broad consultative process with key stakeholders convened by UNICEF Armenia. Based on nationally representative data from the Armenian Integrated Living Conditions Survey 2013/14, the study finds that 64 per cent of children under 18 are deprived in 2 or more dimensions, with a substantially higher rate in rural than in urban areas. The highest rates of deprivation are in access to utilities, quality housing and leisure activities. More than one in four children are both multidimensionally deprived and live in consumption-poor households, while more than one in three are deprived but do not live in poor households. The findings suggest that to target the most vulnerable children, policies should concentrate on closing the rural/urban divide in infrastructure and on strengthening social safety nets, especially in rural areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Lucia Ferrone & Yekaterina Chzhen & UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti, 2016. "Child Poverty in Armenia: National Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis," Papers inwopa862, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa862
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alkire, Sabina & Foster, James, 2011. "Counting and multidimensional poverty measurement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7), pages 476-487.
    2. François Bourguignon & Satya R. Chakravarty, 2019. "The Measurement of Multidimensional Poverty," Themes in Economics, in: Satya R. Chakravarty (ed.), Poverty, Social Exclusion and Stochastic Dominance, pages 83-107, Springer.
    3. Chris De Neubourg & Marlous de Milliano & Ilze Plavgo, 2014. "Lost (in) Dimensions: Consolidating progress in multidimensional poverty research," Papers inwopa718, Innocenti Working Papers.
    4. Corak, Miles, 2006. "Do Poor Children Become Poor Adults? Lessons from a Cross Country Comparison of Generational Earnings Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 1993, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. A. Atkinson, 2003. "Multidimensional Deprivation: Contrasting Social Welfare and Counting Approaches," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 1(1), pages 51-65, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lucia Ferrone & Yekaterina Chzhen, 2018. "How to Reach the Sustainable Development Goal 1.2? Simulating Different Strategies to Reduce Multidimensional Child Poverty in Two Middle-Income Countries," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 11(3), pages 711-728, June.
    2. Lisa Hjelm & Lucia Ferrone & Sudhanshu Handa & Yekaterina Chzhen, 2016. "Comparing Approaches to the Measurement of Multidimensional Child Poverty," Papers inwopa872, Innocenti Working Papers.
    3. Di Qi & Yichao Wu, 2019. "Comparing the Extent and Levels of Child Poverty by the Income and Multidimensional Deprivation Approach in China," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 12(2), pages 627-645, April.
    4. Eunju Kim & Shailen Nandy, 2018. "Multidimensional Child Poverty in Korea: Developing Child-Specific Indicators for the Sustainable Development Goals," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 11(3), pages 1029-1050, June.
    5. Lucia Ferrone & Marlous de Milliano, 2018. "Multidimensional Child Poverty in three Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 11(3), pages 755-781, June.

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    Keywords

    child poverty; child well-being; multiple deprivation; sustainable development;
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