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Child Well-being in Advanced Economies in the Late 2000s


  • Bruno Martorano
  • Luisa Natali
  • Chris De Neubourg
  • Jonathan Bradshaw


This paper compares the well-being of children across the most economically advanced countries of the world. It discusses the methodological issues involved in comparing children’s well-being across countries and explains how a Child Well-being Index is constructed to rank countries according to their performance in advancing child well-being. The Index uses 30 indicators combined into 13 components, again summarised in 5 dimensions for 35 rich countries. Data from various sources are combined to capture aspects of child well-being: material well-being, health, education, behaviour and risks, housing and environment. The scores for the countries on all variables and combinations of variables are discussed in detail. The Child Well-being Index reveals that serious differences exist across countries suggesting that in many, improvement could be made in the quality of children’s lives.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruno Martorano & Luisa Natali & Chris De Neubourg & Jonathan Bradshaw, 2013. "Child Well-being in Advanced Economies in the Late 2000s," Papers inwopa684, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa684

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1994:84:4:543-547_8 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Bruno Martorano & Luisa Natali & Chris De Neubourg & Jonathan Bradshaw, 2013. "Children’s Subjective Well-being in Rich Countries," Papers inwopa686, Innocenti Working Papers.
    3. Liliana Fernandes & Américo Mendes & Aurora Teixeira, 2013. "A Weighted Multidimensional Index of Child Well-Being Which Incorporates Children’s Individual Perceptions," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 803-829, December.
    4. Jonathan Bradshaw & Petra Hoelscher & Dominic Richardson & *UNICEF, 2007. "Comparing Child Well-Being in OECD Countries: Concepts and methods," Papers inwopa07/38, Innocenti Working Papers.
    5. Liliana Fernandes & Américo Mendes & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2010. "A review essay on child well-being measurement: uncovering the paths for future research," FEP Working Papers 396, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    6. Almas Heshmati & Arno Tausch & Chemen S. J. Bajalan, 2008. "Measurement and Analysis of Child Well-Being in Middle and High Income Countries," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 5(2), pages 187-249, December.
    7. David Carey & Ekkehard Ernst, 2006. "Improving Education Achievement and Attainment in Luxembourg," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 508, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno Martorano & Luisa Natali & Chris De Neubourg & Jonathan Bradshaw, 2013. "Child Well-being in Economically Rich Countries: Changes in the first decade of the 21st century," Papers inwopa685, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Bruno Martorano & Luisa Natali & Chris De Neubourg & Jonathan Bradshaw, 2013. "Children’s Subjective Well-being in Rich Countries," Papers inwopa686, Innocenti Working Papers.

    More about this item


    child related policies; child well-being; comparative analysis; industrialized countries;

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics

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