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Different Modeling Strategies for Discrete Choice Models of Female Labour Supply: Estimates for Switzerland


  • Reto Nyffeler


In recent applications of discrete choice models of labour supply considerable attention has been devoted to strategies to increase the flexibility of models for a better fit to the data. These include the introduction of random parameters, fixed cost of work or flexible functional forms of preferences. Based on estimates of models of recent studies this paper compares these different modeling strategies. Results for Swiss data show that the traditional way to interpret fixed cost of work is ad hoc. Furthermore our results indicate that care should be taken when using very general function forms of preferences

Suggested Citation

  • Reto Nyffeler, 2005. "Different Modeling Strategies for Discrete Choice Models of Female Labour Supply: Estimates for Switzerland," Diskussionsschriften dp0508, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
  • Handle: RePEc:ube:dpvwib:dp0508

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Apps, P. F. & Rees, R., 1996. "Labour supply, household production and intra-family welfare distribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 199-219, May.
    8. Dickens, William T & Lundberg, Shelly J, 1993. "Hours Restrictions and Labor Supply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(1), pages 169-192, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bessho, Shun-ichiro & Hayashi, Masayoshi, 2014. "Intensive margins, extensive margins, and spousal allowances in the Japanese system of personal income taxes: A discrete choice analysis," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 162-178.

    More about this item


    multinomial logit; household labour supply; taxation; microsimulation;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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