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Equity and CO2 Emissions Distribution in Climate Change Integrated Assessment

Author

Listed:
  • Nicola Cantore

    () (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan - University of York)

  • Emilio Padilla

    () (Departament d'Economia Aplicada, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona)

Abstract

Emissions distribution is a focus variable for the design of future international agreements to tackle global warming. This paper specifically analyses the future path of emissions distribution and its determinants in different scenarios. Whereas our analysis is driven by tools which are typically applied in the income distribution literature and which have recently been applied to the analysis of CO2 emissions distribution, a new methodological approach is that our study is driven by simulations run with a popular regionalised optimal growth climate change model over the 1995-2105 period. We find that the architecture of environmental policies, the implementation of flexible mechanisms and income concentration are key determinants of emissions distribution over time. In particular we find a robust positive relationship between measures of inequalities

Suggested Citation

  • Nicola Cantore & Emilio Padilla, 2007. "Equity and CO2 Emissions Distribution in Climate Change Integrated Assessment," Working Papers wpdea0705, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
  • Handle: RePEc:uab:wprdea:wpdea0705
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Duro, Juan Antonio & Padilla, Emilio, 2006. "International inequalities in per capita CO2 emissions: A decomposition methodology by Kaya factors," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 170-187, March.
    9. Mark Heil & Quentin Wodon, 2000. "Future Inequality in CO2 Emissions and the Impact of Abatement Proposals," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, pages 163-181.
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