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Credit Access and Approval

Author

Listed:
  • Stefania Basiglio

    () (Faculty of Law, University of Trento, Italy)

  • Paola De Vincentiis

    () (Department of Management, University of Torino, Italy)

  • Eleonora Isaia

    () (Department of Management, University of Torino, Italy)

  • Mariacristina Rossi

    () (Department of Management, University of Torino, Italy)

Abstract

This work focuses on the credit access and credit demand of Italian firms using a sample representative of Italian firms. We investigate whether the gender of the decision-maker of the firm affects the demand for credit and we focus on regional differences in credit access and denial. Results suggest that women are significantly less likely to ask for credit, while no significant differences in credit approval are found between the two genders.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefania Basiglio & Paola De Vincentiis & Eleonora Isaia & Mariacristina Rossi, 2019. "Credit Access and Approval," Working papers 061, Department of Economics and Statistics (Dipartimento di Scienze Economico-Sociali e Matematico-Statistiche), University of Torino.
  • Handle: RePEc:tur:wpapnw:061
    as

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    File URL: http://www.bemservizi.unito.it/repec/tur/wpapnw/m61.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2019
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Steven Ongena & Alexander Popov, 2016. "Gender Bias and Credit Access," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(8), pages 1691-1724, December.
    2. Eckel, Catherine C. & Grossman, Philip J., 2008. "Men, Women and Risk Aversion: Experimental Evidence," Handbook of Experimental Economics Results, Elsevier.
    3. Muravyev, Alexander & Talavera, Oleksandr & Schäfer, Dorothea, 2009. "Entrepreneurs' gender and financial constraints: Evidence from international data," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 270-286, June.
    4. Chihmao Hsieh & Simon C. Parker & C. Mirjam Praag, 2017. "Risk, balanced skills and entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 287-302, February.
    5. Maria Lucia Stefani & Valerio Vacca, 2013. "Credit access for female firms: evidence from a survey on European SMEs," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 176, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. Elizabeth Asiedu & James A. Freeman & Akwasi Nti-Addae, 2012. "Access to Credit by Small Businesses: How Relevant Are Race, Ethnicity, and Gender?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 532-537, May.
    7. David G. Blanchflower & Phillip B. Levine & David J. Zimmerman, 2003. "Discrimination in the Small-Business Credit Market," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 930-943, November.
    8. Alberto F. Alesina & Francesca Lotti & Paolo Emilio Mistrulli, 2013. "Do Women Pay More For Credit? Evidence From Italy," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 11, pages 45-66, January.
    9. Francesca Maria Cesaroni & Francesca Lotti & Paolo Emilio Mistrulli, 2013. "Female firms and banks� lending behaviour: what happened during the great recession?," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 177, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    10. Cavalluzzo, Ken S & Cavalluzzo, Linda C, 1998. "Market Structure and Discrimination: The Case of Small Businesses," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 30(4), pages 771-792, November.
    11. repec:bla:presci:v:97:y:2018:i:2:p:301-322 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2001. "Boys will be Boys: Gender, Overconfidence, and Common Stock Investment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(1), pages 261-292.
    13. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-474, June.
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    16. Dawson, Christopher & Henley, Andrew, 2012. "Gender, Risk and Venture Creation Intentions," IZA Discussion Papers 6947, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Credit demand; Italian firms; Gender.;

    JEL classification:

    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • H81 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Governmental Loans; Loan Guarantees; Credits; Grants; Bailouts
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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