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Measuring Selection Incentives in Managed Care: Evidence from the Massachusetts State Employee Insurance Program

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  • Anupa Bir
  • Karen Eggleston

Abstract

Health economists and policymakers have long recognized that capitation gives insurers incentive to manipulate their offerings to deter the sick and attract the healthy. The shadow-price ap- proach to measuring such selection incentives was pioneered by Frank, Glazer and McGuire (2000). We extend their model to allow for partial capitation and nonfinancial concerns of insurers. We calculate three kinds of selection metrics using managed care medical and pharmacy spending data for fiscal years 2001 and 2002 from the Massachusetts state employee insurance program. Financial returns to risk selection are high, as indicated by all three selection indices as well as by the direct profits an insurer could earn if it could exclude unprofitable patients. Empirically, the financial temptation to distort service quality increases non- linearly with supply-side cost sharing. The more an insurer di- rectly values quality or patient benefit relative to profit, the less severe risk selection incentives become.

Suggested Citation

  • Anupa Bir & Karen Eggleston, 2006. "Measuring Selection Incentives in Managed Care: Evidence from the Massachusetts State Employee Insurance Program," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0605, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  • Handle: RePEc:tuf:tuftec:0605
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karen Eggleston & Randall P. Ellis & Mingshan Lu, 2007. "Prevention and Dynamic Risk Adjustment," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2007-023, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    2. repec:spr:eujhec:v:18:y:2017:i:9:d:10.1007_s10198-016-0859-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Timothy J. Layton & Randall P. Ellis & Thomas G. McGuire, 2015. "Assessing Incentives for Adverse Selection in Health Plan Payment Systems," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series wp2015-024, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    4. McGuire, Thomas G. & Newhouse, Joseph P. & Normand, Sharon-Lise & Shi, Julie & Zuvekas, Samuel, 2014. "Assessing incentives for service-level selection in private health insurance exchanges," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 47-63.
    5. Gilbert E. Metcalf, 2006. "Value-Added Tax," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0608, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    6. Randall P. Ellis & Shenyi Jiang & Tzu-Chun Kuo, 2013. "Does service-level spending show evidence of selection across health plan types?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(13), pages 1701-1712, May.
    7. Ronald Eduardo Gómez Suárez, 2007. "Cream-Skimming And Risk Adjustment in Colombian Health Insurance System:: The Public Insurer Case," ARCHIVOS DE ECONOMÍA 004295, DEPARTAMENTO NACIONAL DE PLANEACIÓN.
    8. Richard van Kleef & Thomas McGuire & Rene van Vliet & Wynand van de Ven, 2015. "Improving Risk Equalization with Constrained Regression," NBER Working Papers 21570, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Wynand P. M. M. Ven & René C. J. A. Vliet & Richard C. Kleef, 2017. "How can the regulator show evidence of (no) risk selection in health insurance markets? Conceptual framework and empirical evidence," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(2), pages 167-180, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    risk selection; managed health care; shadow price; mixed payment;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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